History Podcasts

Rediscovered Viking-era Lewis Chessman Is Predicted To Make A Family Millionaires

Rediscovered Viking-era Lewis Chessman Is Predicted To Make A Family Millionaires

An old heirloom looks likely to make a lucky family a fortune when it goes to auction. They found one of the Lewis Chess pieces that belongs to one of the most famous chess sets in all of history. The Lewis Chessmen are one of Scotland’s most prized historical treasures. The discovery of the medieval chess piece means that we almost have a complete set of these extraordinary Norse chessmen.

Stored in a Drawer

The find was made in Edinburgh and in a family home. According to the BBC “the Edinburgh family's grandfather, an antique dealer , had bought the chess piece for £5 in 1964.” It appears that he bought the chess piece without fully realizing its significance, even though the grandfather had catalogued the item. According to the Daily Mail , “it can be assumed that he was unaware he had purchased an important historic artifact .” The family who owns the item want to remain anonymous.

The chess piece is made out of walrus ivory and was passed down as an heirloom. The family has a lot of antiques and they have kept the piece for over 50 years. It was kept in a drawer in a bag which helped to preserve it. According to the Daily Mail , one member “of the family thought it had magical qualities.”

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The newly discovered piece is a warder which 'has immense character and power'. ( Courtesy of Sotheby's )

The Edinburgh family became curious about the chess piece in recent years and decided to get it appraised. They took it to one of the world’s leading Auction Houses, Sotheby’s of London. The BBC quotes Sotheby's expert Alexander Kader, who stated that his "jaw dropped" when he realized what he was appraising.

The Lewis Chessmen

The family had in their possession one of the lost Lewis Chessmen. The piece is rather weather-beaten and slightly damaged, but it seems to represent a warrior. It is known as a warder, a man with helmet, shield, and sword and it is the equivalent of a rook on a modern chess board.

The Lewis Chessmen are a group of chess pieces that were found on the Isle of Lewis , in the bleak Outer Hebrides in the North Atlantic, in 1831. They were uncovered when a storm swept aside some sands on Uig Bay and were found by sheer chance. They are made from walrus ivory and whale teeth. Some counters from another game and an ivory buckle were also uncovered with the pieces.

The Lewis Chessmen are a group of chess pieces that were discovered on the Isle of Lewis in 1831. ( Courtesy of Sotheby's )

The pawns are from 3.5 inches (8 centimeters) high and the queen is 7 inches (10 centimeters) high. The pawns come in a variety of sizes and this may indicate that they come from a number of different sets. According to the BBC, the “Lewis Chessmen set includes seated kings and queens, bishops, knights, and standing warders and pawns.” However, five pieces had been lost and the set was incomplete.

The Lewis Chessmen pawns are from 3.5 inches (8 centimeters) high. ( Courtesy of Sotheby's )

From the Viking-era

The pieces are from the late Viking era and they were probably owned by a Norse noble or monarch. It is likely that based on their style of carving that they were made in Norway, but some state they were made in England. Why such valuable pieces were abandoned is something of a mystery. Several theories have been proposed to explain why the pieces were buried, including that it was hidden during an attack or after a shipwreck.

The Lewis Chessmen are very popular, and the pieces are on display in Edinburgh and London. They have been a source of controversy in the past when the Scottish government demanded that all of the pieces be kept on display in Edinburgh. The Lewis Chessmen have become part of popular culture and even inspired a scene in one of the smash-hit ‘ Harry Potter ’ movies.

The Lewis Chessmen are very popular, and the pieces are on display in Edinburgh and London. ( Courtesy of Sotheby's )

Sotheby’s examined the chess piece for six months before they announced the discovery of the long-lost chessman. This was to ensure that they were absolutely certain of its authenticity. The piece is going on display in both London and Edinburgh before it is going to auction. Sotheby’s estimate for the piece is in the range of 600,000 to one million pounds sterling (800,000 to 1.2 million dollars).

Sotheby’s examined the chess piece for six months. ( Courtesy of Sotheby's )

Now, because of the discovery, only four chess pieces are missing, one knight and three warders. But the chances of finding more after all these centuries are surely very low. It is hoped that a British museum may seek to buy it or be able to display it at some date in the future.


Explorator 22.22

Thanks to Arthur Shippee, Dave Sowdon, Edward Rockstein, Kurt Theis,
John McMahon, Barnea Selavan, Joseph Lauer, Mike Ruggeri, Hernan Astudillo,
Richard Campbell, Barbara Saylor Rodgers, Bob Heuman, David Critchley, Andrew Szegedy-Maszak,
Richard Miller, Kris Curry, Rick Heli, Richard C. Griffiths, Frank MacKay,
Don Buck, and Ross W. Sargent for headses upses this week (as always hoping I have left no one out).

Suggestion that chronic ear infections may have led to the demise of Neanderthals:

Feature on heidelbergensis:

On giving birth, 2 million years bp:

Latest ‘out of Africa needs to be rewritten maybe’ piece:

Italy will be helping to restore some Libyan antiquities:

France helped in the restoration of some Sudanese antiquities:

A ‘mystery box’ from Tut’s tomb was opened for the first time:

… and Zahi Hawass says he’ll reveal how Tut died in 2020:

… and some details about the Tut opera:

Restoration of more Ramses II statues in Luxor is under way:

Plans to restore a pair of New Kingdom sarcophagi:

Plans to convert Tanis Archaeological City into an ‘open museum’:

Pondering Rameses II’s ‘greatness’:

On the reverence for crocodiles in Egypt:

Somewhat vague item on the find of a mosaic floor at Yerevan, apparently with Urartian connections:

Less vague item on Urartian finds from a site in Iran:

Feature on Khirbet Al Umari:

Plenty of coverage of the possible identification of the site of Edom:

… and with a focus on copper production there:

More on the mosaics at the ‘Burnt Church’ at Hippos Sussita:

More on the possible location of the site of Emmaus being found:

Feature on the ‘competition’ to restore Palmyra:

Commentary on that ancient mosque find in Rahat:

A gold mask and bronze helmets dating to the 6th century BCE from Ahlada:

A 2600 years bp gorgon image (fragmentary) from a cave in Gibraltar:

A Hellenistic lion statue from Assos:

An update on the dig at Alexandria Troas:

‘Important’ Roman finds from near Segontium Roman Fort:

Illegal excavations in Mardin revealed a Roman mosaic:

A pair of Roman statues recently found in Israel now have a home:

Remains of a 4th century CE abbatoir from Ipplepen are extending the map of Roman occupation:

Latest finds from the dig at Ribchester Roman fort:

A 2000 years bp milestone was being used as a coffee table in Turkey:

I think we mentioned the identification of the site of Tenea:

Some 1st century ‘pendants’ excavated at the beginning of the 20th century in Shropshire have been reidentified as makeup tools:

Concerns for the Roman catacombs in Gozo:

Mary Boatwright was talking about ancient revolts:

Feature on Elizabeth Shrader’s work on Mary Magdalene:

Peter Jones was pondering David Cameron:

Honours for Jacques Bailly:

What Marc Erwin Babej and William Wylie are up to:

Nice feature on Latin in an Australian school:

Feature on NASA’s use of Classics:

Feature on scanning Plautine verse:

An Iliad reading at Emory:

The Temple of Poseidon is the latest ancient edifice to host a fashion show:

On drinking vinegar in Roman times:

On some details about ‘Gladiator’ you might not have been aware of:

On the popularity of Stoicism today:

The return of the Parthenon Marbles is a major focus for the Culture Minister:

… and Coca Cola can’t use the Parthenon in advertising any more:

OpEd on the Marbles and the BM:

On Roman history and the future of the US:

On Alexander the Great and globalization:

On Socrates and responding to climate change:

A Bronze Age phallic statue from Sweden:

5000 years bp tools, pottery, and food remains from a site in Devon:

‘Guard chambers’ revealed at an Iron Age hillfort in Shropshire:

A 750 years bp scroll is shedding light on Gloucester Castle:

A carving of Eleanor of Aquitaine (maybe) found during conservation work at Bradwell Abbey:

Evidence of a medieval tower structure at the Trapesitsa Fortress:

A 19th century (?) pipe kiln find from Wrocester:

A rising tide helped William Wallace to win at Stirling Bridge, apparently:

Research on a painted German shield in the Landesmuseum suggests it’s 1700 years bp:

Suggestion that Viking berserkers ingested henbane:

Remembering the discovery of the Whitehorse Hill cist back in 2011:

The Church of Scotland is suing for its share of a Viking hoard found on church land:

6500 19th century burials excavated prior to HS2 station construction in Birmingham:

Protection for a pre-WWI battleship wreck off Lundy Island:

An interesting 800 years bp figurine of Jesus is being returned to York (not sure if this is really repatriation):

Digging has resumed at Clare Castle Country Park:

More on that Roman bronze cauldron find in Norway:

More on that Pictish burial ground near Muir of Ord:

More on plans for Brenel’s ‘other bridge’:

More on that ‘multiple head clan feud’ burial:

More on drought revealing the ‘Spanish Stonehenge’:

More on Vikings on Iceland and the demise of walrus:

More on that Norman coin hoard find:

More on use of pig grease at Stonehenge:

Carbon dating has confirmed an Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region site is Neolithic:

From the same region comes word of the find of a 1000 years bp royal burial:

I think we mentioned this 19th century Chinese battleship wreck in the Yellow Sea:

Carbon dating suggests finds from Keeladi may be 300 years older than previously thought:

A large Nataraja idol find from Adhirampattinam:

Wondering about a ‘pillar like structure’ found at a ‘car shed’ site in Aarey Colony:

The ASI has a plan to register ‘family treasures’:

An old ‘rubbish pit’ beneath Blenheim Bridge (NZ):

Evidence of an apparently undocumented European fortress in Tidore (Indonesia):

Plans to rebury a 155 years bp shipwreck found on a Victoria beach:

Restoration work has resumed at a 14th century ‘educational complex’ in Azerbaijan:

Feature on mass production techniques for the terracotta warriors:

Feature on a Dong Yuan painting that has limited viewings:

Feature on Lady Han Ximeng:

Assorted finds from a dig at Pointe-Claire:

The discovery of a possibly Native American burial has occasioned a dig at a condo construction site in Florida:

19th century finds at an Embarcadero housing site:

Latest 19th century ship find in Lake Michigan:

Feature on a WCU dig at a Cherokee site in Cherokee, appropriately enough:

Hypish sort of thing on a University of Idaho dig in Moscow:

Still anticipating the find of the Endeavour:

That border wall/fence is raising concerns for 20+ archaeological sites in Arizona:

Possible Native American remains on Hutchinson Island in the wake of Hurricane Dorian:

High waters in the Great Lakes are apparently causing all sorts of things to wash ashore:

Ongoing efforts to preserve a Hopewell Mound in Butler County:

Latest piece in/on the peopling of North America puzzle:

Not sure if we mentioned this ‘frozen poop knife’ recreation experiment:

Feature on the impeachment of Samuel Chase:

In case you missed the ‘Connecticut Vampire’ stuff a while back:

Feature on the ‘first practicing Jew’ in North America:

Latest finds reveal the extent of the Mayan city of X’baatun:

… and looting is a problem there too:

On evidence for ‘ancient use of fire’ in the Amazon:

The Oriental Institute is celebrating its centennial:

On the problem with giant tour ships:

Feature on Elizabeth Gloucester:

On the history of celebrity:

Rethinking Poe’s influences:

That Egyptian boat recreation is being donated to Turkey:

A painting from a small-town New York auction a while ago might be a van Dyck:

Milton’s notes on Shakespeare have been found, apparently:

… and a ‘secret message’ in his Paradise Lost:

Feature on the 25 greatest philosophers:

St John the Divine Cathedral in New York is also recovering from a fire:

More on the Cornish origin of Bronze Age tin in the Mediterranean:

Some ‘little known’ things about Raiders of the Lost Ark:

Latest Turin Shroud claims:

Review of a book about van Gogh’s sister-in-law:

Fossils from the Cradle of Humankind:

The AUC donated a number of items to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization:

Feature on the Museum of Ancient Arles:

Feature on various German museums:

Feature on the Rothschild collection:

Feature on the Getty’s major plan to save threatened antiquities:

Some pre-Hispanic items were on the block in France, despite objections from the Mexican government:

I think we mentioned this digital reconstruction of ‘humanity’s oldest ancestor’:

Feature on space archaeology with a Maya focus:

Using DNA to clarify the colonial history of Puerto Rico:

Descendents of early Europeans and Africans in the US carry Native American DNA, apparently:

A bust in Sulaimani of folks smuggling antiquities and human organs (!):

An antiquities bust in Charsadda:

anonymous swiss collector:

Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues:

Illicit Cultural Property:

France returned an Arabic inscription to Saudi Arabia:

A Greek marble stele from Greece was returned to a museum in Munich:

Italy returned some smuggled objects to Libya:

Iraq will be repatriating a pile of smuggled artifacts from Turkey:

… and the one which should appear later today:

CBA Wessex Annual Conference (November 2019):

Taygete Atlantis excavations blogs aggregator:

Archaeology Podcast Network:

http://www.radioscribe.com/bknspade.htm
================================================================
EXPLORATOR is a free weekly newsletter bringing you the latest
news of archaeological finds, historical research and the like.
Various on-line news and magazine sources are scoured for news of
the ‘ancient world’ (broadly construed: practically anything relating
to archaeology or history up to a century or so ago is fair
game) and every Sunday they are delivered to your mailbox free of
charge!
================================================================
Useful Addresses
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Past issues of Explorator are available on the web via our
Yahoo site:

To subscribe to Explorator, send a blank email message to:

To unsubscribe, send a blank email message to:

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================================================================
Explorator is Copyright (c) 2019 David Meadows. Feel free to
distribute these listings via email to your pals, students,
teachers, etc., but please include this copyright notice. These
links are not to be posted to any website by any means (whether
by direct posting or snagging from a usenet group or some other
email source) without my express written permission. I think it
is only right that I be made aware of public fora which are
making use of content gathered in Explorator. Thanks!
================================================================


Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Underground Museum in Krakow reveals city’s medieval history

Krakow is opening its newest attraction — twenty feet under the main market square (Rynek Glowny). The new underground archaeological park will show off the city’s foundations dating back to the early Middle Ages, while multimedia exhibits immerse visitors in the ambiance of Krakow at the start of the 13th century.

Acre, Crusades get spotlight in international history conference

The city of Amsterdam played host to the 21st International Congress on Historical Sciences last month, bringing hundreds of historians together from a wide range of areas. Medievalists were well-represented with over a dozen papers dedicated to the crusades and the city of Acre in particular.

The sessions were organized by Professor John France of the University of Wales-Swasnsea for the Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East (SSCLE). Professor France said it was “a lively set of sessions which shows the range and depth of scholarship on the crusades.”


Explorator 22.30

Thanks to Arthur Shippee, Dave Sowdon, Edward Rockstein, Kurt Theis,
John McMahon, Barnea Selavan, Joseph Lauer, Mike Ruggeri, Hernan Astudillo,
Richard Campbell, Barbara Saylor Rodgers, Bob Heuman, David Critchley, Sami Obeid,
Richard Miller, Kris Curry, Rick Heli, Richard C. Griffiths, Frank MacKay,
Don Buck, and Ross W. Sargent for headses upses this week (as always hoping I have left no one out).

Evidence that modern humans arrived in south Asia some 114 000 years bp:

Hints about a 100 000 years bp site of some sort in South Africa (not sure about this one):

More on dating Neanderthal cave paintings in Spain:

DNA analysis suggests some possible origins for the millions of ibis (and other bird) mummies:

Studying mummy bones with xrays and infrared light:

Reviving (sort of) the theory that Tut died in a chariot-related accident:

It’s now officially illegal to climb the pyramids (among other things):

Not sure how ‘new’ this is … archaeologists apparently know whether Khufu’s remains might be:

A Neolithic settlement (with a sewer system of some sort) from Mardin:

Human tooth jewellery from Catal Huyuk:

I think we mentioned this 4000 years bp Babylonian recipe revival:

3500 years bp artifacts with ‘Balkan motifs’ from the Maydos Church Hill Mound site:

Latest finds from the Iron Age (mostly) site of Tell Ziraa (Jordan):

Digging has resumed at the Burnt City:

Review of Goodman, *Josephus’s The Jewish War: A Biography*:

Feature on Judeans worshipping (maybe) Anat at Elephantine:

Feature on what Jesus really looked like:

Feature on the 150th anniversary of the Suez canal:

Feature on WWI aerial photography of Jordan:

Egypt has increasingly been announcing that they’re going to make an announcement, e.g.:

More on yellow paint on Apries’ gate:

Much more coverage of climate change contributing to the fall of the Assyrians:

A terraced sanctuary from Tarracina/Terracina:

In case you missed the ‘Roman catacombs’ find at Saqqara:

… and highlighting an interesting Greek inscription:

A new MOU to protect Cyriot archaeological sites:

The Los Milagros de Merida aqueduct was a fourth century/Byzantine construction apparently:

Classicists are getting attention because of ‘quid pro quo’:

… and there’s something on gubernatorial too:

Feature on Brent Davis’ work with Linear A:

Plenty of Troy-related articles to hype the upcoming BM exhibition, first on Troy’s ‘endless allure’:

… on what really happened there:

Feature on Helen of Troy and other ancient women:

Feature on some Roman writings:

Feature/documentary hype on graffiti from Pompeii:

Feature on the connections between tyranny and democracy in ancient authors:

Charlotte Higgins on what Classics taught her (among others, I imagine):

Peter Jones on Greek competition:

Edith Hall on ‘working class’ appreciation of Classics:

Georgia Nugent is the newest president of Illinois Wesleyan:

Review of Jean Moorcroft Wilson’s biography of Robert Graves:

Review of Catherine Wilson, *How to be an Epicurean:

Nine things about Julius Caesar:

China’s President Xi is the latest to back Greece’s call for the return of the Parthenon marbles:

… and the latest OpEd on the matter:

Not sure where to put this legal dispute over a bust of Alexander the Great:

Feature on the Portland Vase:

More on the shipwrecks off Kasos:

More on the non-destruction-by-tsunami of Minoan Civilization:

Pondering who might be America’s Brutus:

Latest fall of Rome/US comparison:

Reports of a 5000 years bp mass (?) burial from Marne:

Study suggests axeheads made of Alpine rock were economically important in Neolithic Europe:

I think we mentioned this 1200 years bp Pictish cross slab a while ago:

Remains of a 15th century ‘high status’ house in Wales:

A metal detectorist found a medival sapphire ring in Nottinghamshire:

A medieval shipwreck from the Volga River:

A ‘church’ found at Bulgaria’s Trapezitsa site may have actually been a synagogue:

Possible remains of some Tudor/Stuart shipwreck victims from a dig in Wales:

Some 17th century shipwrecks off Sweden, possibly with a Vasa connection:

A ‘booze shipment’ associated with Nicholas II from a Baltic shipwreck:

An Iron Age sword found a couple of years ago near Santon Bridge is going on display:

A project mapping shipwrecks off Iceland:

Folks have made ‘dozens’ of ‘treasure’ finds across Worcestershire:

Interesting item on a 20th century item found in a 15th century Estonian shipwreck:

A wall collapse at Lewes Castle:

An award for the Ness of Brodgar Excavations:

A talk on finds in and around Dunstable:

Feature on Celtic women in France:

Feature on birch bark tar as glue for a period of 50 000 years or so:

The ‘owner’ of the Galloway Hoard has been identified:

Not sure about this one: a 17th century ‘underground casino’ from Russia:

Questioning the treatment of some seized antiquities in Chennai:

A dog walker found an arrowhead in Oregon (date?):

Feature on the excavations of the Texas Revolution site at San Felipe:

Another Vero Beach site with items from early settlers to Florida:

A cache/hoard of 19th century coins from Dawson City (Yukon):

Somewhat vague item on burials found at a development site in Chatanooga:

Feature on the Centralia Massacre:

Review of Greenidge, *Black Radical*

More on the recent finds from the Hunley:

More on that dislodged shipwreck near Niagara Falls:

I think we mentioned this high altitude site of Wat’a that predates Machu Picchu:

Feature on the looting/rescuing of Teyuna:

Feature on some interesting child burials from Salango (Ecuador):

Feature on the Stendahl archive and what it reveals about trade in Mexican Antiquities:

Feature on the history of assassinations:

Feature on some giant choirbooks used in medieval times:

Some coverage of the flooding in Venice:

On the ‘Lady in a fur Wrap’ mystery:

On the age of olive trees in Gethsemane:

A Botticelli rediscovered in Cardiff:

Feature (connected to an auction of course) on Artemisia Gentileschi:

On eyebrows through the ages:

Feature on Dorothy Garrod (honoured with a portrait at Oxford):

The National Library of Israel has put a pile of books online:

Feature on Muslim soldiers in WWI:

Interesting feature on the feminist origins of fairytales:

Review of Hardyment, *Novel Houses*:

Ancient Artifacts of Afghanistan:

Women Artists of the Dutch Golden Age:

Armada portaits of Elizabeth I:

Those 30 sarcophagi from El-Assasif are headed to the GEM:

OpEd on the BM’s ‘Inspired by the East’ exhibition:

On the Penn Museum ‘redesign’:

A pair of antiquities exhibitions at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo:

A Trustee has left a trove of old masters to the Met:

More opEds on the ‘plunder’ in the BM:

In case you’ve always wanted to be a museum director:

Big bucks for a Chinese teapot:

… and Gentileschi’s Lucretia:

Sowthwell Minster is the latest building to get the 3d scan treatment:

Latest ‘reconsctruction’ is a 7000 years bp Swedish ‘shaman woman’:

A Rembrandt theft at Dulwich Picture Gallery was foiled:

A verdict (disappointing, apparently) in the Bulwer art theft:

A bill to fight using antiquities for money-laundering might be of interest:

A copyright crime related to Nefertiti (?):

anonymous swiss collector:

Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues:

Illicit Cultural Property:

================================================================
REPATRIATION AND RECOVERY
================================================================
An ancient wine cup that was awarded to the first victor of the Marathon of the modern Olympics was returned to Greece:

The UK is returning a statue of Persephone looted from Libya in 2012:

More on the UK returning Buddha statuary to Afghanistan:

The Rijksmuseum is angry about Dutch failure to return stolen colonial art:

… and the one which should appear later today:

Taygete Atlantis excavations blogs aggregator:

Archaeology Podcast Network:

http://www.radioscribe.com/bknspade.htm
================================================================
EXPLORATOR is a free weekly newsletter bringing you the latest
news of archaeological finds, historical research and the like.
Various on-line news and magazine sources are scoured for news of
the ‘ancient world’ (broadly construed: practically anything relating
to archaeology or history up to a century or so ago is fair
game) and every Sunday they are delivered to your mailbox free of
charge!
================================================================
Useful Addresses
================================================================
You can read Explorator online at:

Past issues of Explorator are also available on the web via our
groups.io page:

To subscribe to Explorator, send a blank email message to:

To unsubscribe, send a blank email message to:

To send a ‘heads up’ to the editor or contact him for other
reasons:

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================================================================
Explorator is Copyright (c) 2019 David Meadows. Feel free to
distribute these listings via email to your pals, students,
teachers, etc., but please include this copyright notice. These
links are not to be posted to any website by any means (whether
by direct posting or snagging from a usenet group or some other
email source) without my express written permission. I think it
is only right that I be made aware of public fora which are
making use of content gathered in Explorator. Thanks!
================================================================


Explorator 20.24

Thanks to Arthur Shippee, Dave Sowdon, Edward Rockstein, Kurt Theis,
John McMahon, Barnea Selavan, Joseph Lauer, Mike Ruggeri, Hernan Astudillo,
Barbara Saylor Rodgers, Bob Heuman, Bill Kennedy, Magnus Fiskesjo, Rick Heli,
Richard C. Griffiths, and Ross W. Sargent for headses upses this week
(as always hoping I have left no one out).

On the origins of genital herpes:

On Neanderthal genetics’ effect on us:

More on that dig by China in Kenya:

More on sapiens being around longer than previously thought:

A broken bit of an Old Kingdom obelisk from near Giza:

A head from a statue of Akhenaten found in Minya:

A Ptolemaic/Roman era pet cemetery near the Red Sea:

What it’s like to crawl into an Egyptian tomb:

What Zahi Hawass is explaining now:

More on how Egyptians transported the stone to build the pyramids:

Studying the development of agriculture and cities in northern Mesopotamia:

A flight ban has effectively halted a dig in Iraqi Kurdistan:

Hamas has ‘levelled’ a Canaanite site in Gaza:

OpEd on the politics of archaeology in Israel:

… and a feature on ‘Temple Mount denial’:

A number of recently-sold DSS fragments are fake, apparently:

The restored Lion of al-Lat is back on display in Damascus:

… there is also mention of a ‘mysterious disk’ in some articles:

A section of Hadrian’s Wall has been found in Newcastle:

A metal detectorist has found a hoard of silver denarii in Dorset:

… while a ‘secret hoard’ from Lincolnshire has gone on display:

Plenty of press coverage of the possible discovery of the tomb of St Nicholas (although the press naturally prefers to use ‘Santa Claus’):

Looking for a 4th century palace in Istanbul:

Nice feature on the Roman dig in Leicester:

Studying the logistics of the Roman army in Wales:

Studying ancient trade routes in Cyprus:

A study of feces from a Roman latrine at Sagalassos:

Rethinking the fate of pagan temples:

A potentially interesting (lost) inscription with Troy references:

Latest ‘benefits of Classics’ piece:

An interview with Daniel Mendelsohn:

… and reviews of his recent tome:

Plans to reconnect Ephesus to the sea:

Finds from a site in Cyprus will be protected even though the site isn’t classified as an archaeological site any more:

… and the church was apparently rather adamant:

… so now the focus is concern for sites in northern Cyprus:

The upper levels of the Colosseum are being opened to the public:

In case you haven’t seen the Cleopatra connection in the latest Assassin’s Creed:

More on plans to charge admission to the Pantheon:

13 000 years bp evidence of use of beeswax as an adhesive:

A copper ax linked to Otzi (?) has been found in the Swiss alps:

… while these Bronze Age finds I think we’ve mentioned before:

Unusual stone tools from a Bronze Age site in Wales:

A possible Norse/Viking meeting place/parliament from Scotland:

Finds from a 14th century necropolis from Bulgaria:

Prussian spearheads from the battle of Grunwald:

Latest exhumation is of a 270 years bp headless Jacobite clan chief:

Studying leprosy in the Middle Ages:

Comparing the social differences between folks buried in dolmens and those buried in caves:

The Ely Bronze Age torc has gone on display:

A mysterious 17th century mural of Cleopatra:

What they’re finding at the Manea colony dig:

Latest theory on King Arthur:

Concerns for the Mary Rose:

Plans to restore a Venice palazzo:

The Svevo Castle in Bari has (re)opened to the public:

—–
Archaeology in Europe Blog:

Big bucks for a Song Dynasty bowl:

Studying Harappan remains from Uttar Pradesh:

Expectations of finding Maori remains at a residential development site:

… while Maori garden remains were found at a Waikato Expressway construction site:

Concerns arising from India’s new antiquities bill:

Feature on some Bronze Age Chinese bells:

Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog:

New Zealand Archaeology eNews:

Latest on that Hurricane Irma canoe:

Damage to a site by Hurricane Maria:

What they’ve found in a Butler Mounds dig:

An older statue controversy from New Mexico:

More on Paul Revere’s outhouse:

Studying life in Colombia 2400 years bp:

15th century accounts of earthquakes in Mexico:

—–
Mike Ruggeri’s Ancient Americas Breaking News:

Interesting account of how an art ‘fraudster’ met his comeuppance:

Applying blockchain methods to archaeology (?):

Not really sure where to put this piece on Novgorod and Russia:

On the myth of language history:

Digging up containers of mustard gas might not be a good idea:

Feature on assorted gold artifacts:

… and the search for assorted artifacts/sites:

On the origins of the concept of ‘evil’:

One of the Scott Expedition folks wasn’t really a team player:

Restoration reveals some hidden figures in a painting at Yale Divinity School:

A Viking reenactment group:

I think we mentioned this database of Jewish art:

Review of Scott, *Against the Grain*:

More on the ‘naked Mona Lisa’:

Archaeology Podcast Network:

A jar from the Plain of Jars:

We had hints of this a while ago … thousands of items are missing from UK museums:

Recreating a lost chapel at Westminster in 3d:

Latest facial reconstruction is on 30 000 years bp Sungir folk:

More on aerial thermal imagery and archaeology:

Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog:

Latest Anonymous Swiss Collector Culture Crime News:

anonymous swiss collector:

Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues:

Illicit Cultural Property:

Feature on a silver stater:

Feature on a coin of Decimus Albinus:

… and the one which should appear later today:

In case you missed the study linking Roman coins to Carthaginian mines:

Bones to Drones: Science in Archaeology (Nov. 2017)

Theoretical Archaeology Group (Dec. 2017):

Hidden Cultural Heritage (April 2018):

Taygete Atlantis excavations blogs aggregator:

http://www.radioscribe.com/bknspade.htm
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the ‘ancient world’ (broadly construed: practically anything relating
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game) and every Sunday they are delivered to your mailbox free of
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Explorator 22.11

Thanks to Arthur Shippee, Dave Sowdon, Edward Rockstein, Kurt Theis,
John McMahon, Barnea Selavan, Joseph Lauer, Mike Ruggeri, Hernan Astudillo,
Richard Campbell, Barbara Saylor Rodgers, Bob Heuman, David Critchley,
Richard Miller, Kris Curry, Rick Heli, Richard C. Griffiths, Frank MacKay,
Bill Gebhardt, Michael J. Connor, Trevor Watkins, Nigel Hetherington,
Don Buck, and Ross W. Sargent for headses upses this week (as always hoping I have left no one out).

I think we’ve had some form of this study on Neanderthal migration through Eurasia:

More on early hominids recycling flint at Ein Zippori:

More on Neanderthal use of adhesive resin:

The same team (?) seems to be pondering the purpose of the Dry Moat around Djoser’s pyramid:

We’re hearing of ‘secret chambers’ in Tut’s tomb again for some reason:

The Lahun Pyramid has opened to the public:

More on Thonis-Heracleion and flooding:

A huge mosaic in Antayka (or environs) will soon be open to the public:

Excavating a possible Hittite petroglyph site, ca 1300 years BCE, in Turkey’s Kirsehir province:

More on that Mitanni ‘palace’ revealed by drought in the reservoir of the Mosul dam:

The fortifications at Tel Shikmona also house remains of a purple dye factory:

Latest reveals from the Huqoq mosaic site:

A solidus of Theodosius II was found in the Galilee region:

Seems to be some politicization going on with that ‘Pilgrim’s Road’ inauguration:

Feature on the Philistines in light of that DNA study (see the relevant section):

Babylon was named a UNESCO Heritage site (renamed?):

… while Egypt is trying to get the ‘Way of the Holy Family’ similar declaration:

Feature on Solomon’s story and its various versions:

Possible Roman finds in Largs:

I think we mentioned this Roman sculpture and chamber pot from Novae:

Roman ‘treasure’ finds from Yorkshire:

A multiple phase commercial/industrial site from Akrotiri:

Interesting votive deposit from Selinunte:

Excavations have resumed at Hadrianopolis:

Feature on Isca Domnoniorum:

Spy plane photos reveal the sites of three Roman camps in Leon:

Some Pompeii-related hype for the exhibition at the Ashmolean:

Feature on the ‘neigbhourhood excavation’ that is part of the Acropolis Museum:

On women as priests in early Christianity:

On the ‘Stones Speak’ initiative in Athens:

Pondering the ‘fall of Rome/America’ narratives:

Ancient sites seem to be all the rage this year with fashion shows, e.g. Fendi:

… Fendi, of course, is funding the restoration of the Temple of Venus:

Makronissos has been declared a ‘site of archaeological interest’:

The Acropolis had to close this week because it was too hot:

Feature (by Adrienne Mayor) on Pandora and AI:

Application of Archilochus:

The Warren Cup was also getting attention during Pride times:

Blaming the demise of the Classical World on Christianity (maybe):

What Robert Kaster is up to:

On Jordan Pickett’s work at Sardis:

Review of Daisy Dunn, *In the Shadow of Vesuvius*:

On Romans and math (sort of):

On Homer and modern culture:

On ancient Greek ‘ideals’ and American independence:

Some Horrible Histories hype:

Revisiting the Spartacus series:

More on that ‘undisturbed’ Roman ship found off Cyprus:

More on the finds at Exeter:

More on York’s proposed ‘Roman Quarter’:

More on Roman mason marks:

The Levanluhta water burial (Finland) reveals Iron Age trade connections with southern Europe:

Apparent confirmation of a sixth century tsunami in Lake Geneva:

Assorted finds from a long-known, possibly Pictish fort site in Dillyminnen:

A pair of Viking-era boat burials from Sweden:

A 16th century ‘looting tunnel’ found beneath Bulgaria’s largest Thracian burial mound:

Remains of a 400 years bp structure on the grounds of a mansion in Bristol:

Remains of a ‘mystery structure’ (maybe 18th century?) from Mold’s Bailey Hill:

What the guy who found the Staffordshire Hoard is up to:

… and a feature on the hoard:

Plans to return to the Ness of Brodgar:

Excavations at the inner bailey of Shrewsbury Castle are about to commence:

Feature on a Magdalenian-era deer tooth necklace from France:

UNESCO doesn’t think the Stonehenge tunnel is a good idea:

… and funding for it apparently isn’t certain:

More on the find of the possible birthplace of Lady Jane Grey:

Remains of a 5000+ years bp house structure from Shanxi:

A 13th century Tamil/Mandarin inscription from China’s Fujiyan province:

I think we had this item on millet farming on the Tibetan plateau a while ago:

Feature on China’s Liangzhu site:

… and they have received Heritage Status:

Feature on early fireworks in China:

Feature on the Forbidden City:

Concerns over elevator installation at an Osaka castle:

Plenty of finds from various periods near downtown Houston:

An 18th century drain was found on the campus of William & Mary:

Plans for a dig in Boston’s Chinatown:

Archaeologists are back at Camp Security:

The Fort Edward dig on Rogers Island will be resuming:

I think we’ve mentioned this 1800s shipwreck in the Gulf of Mexico (but most of this is about a shipwreck off NC?):

Assorted sunken pleasure boats in Lake Tahoe:

Interesting results from a study of the Portsmouth Hopewell earthworks:

Feature on the burial mounds in the Kanawha Valley (WV):

Confederate soldiers’ diaries shed light on slave labour at Gettysburg:

Feature on women’s suffrage in the US:

More on that dig at a Port Huron lighthouse:

Nice feature on Panama City:

—–
Mike Ruggeri’s Ancient Americas Breaking News:

Feature on painting eyes on boats:

Feature on Eva Palmer Sicellanos:

Feature on the diary of Deborah Sampson “who sneaked into George Washington’s army”:

Pondering Founding Fathers’ ideas of happiness:

Feature on Francis Bacon’s secret code:

The restoration of Rembrandt’s Night Watch is under way:

On reuniting and restoring a separated 18th century Torah scroll:

Feature on the Khmissa (and related symbols):

Features on Sarah Parcak and her ‘space archaeology’ (she has a book out):

Feature on Alison Wylie and ‘decolonizing archaeology’:

Another theory on the origins of war:

On the history of the hot dog:

On assorted early ideas about sex:

Feature on Cesare Beccaria:

On the origins of major American art:

How Britain’s art was protected during the Blitz (possibly paywalled):

On a fake book purportedly by Galileo:

What potential space colonies can learn from the experience of New Amsterdam:

On the dragon on the flag of Wales:

Tracking the roots of the Hebrew word ‘misken’:

A neurology study looking at abstract petroglyphs:

Stephanie Burt ponders the reasons for poetry:

Feature on Gentleman Jim (possibly paywalled):

Reviewish sort of thing of a book about Osman Hamdi Bey:

More on ‘stone age’ capuchin monkeys:

Treasures of Ancient Greece:

On the Roman museum planned for York:

The mayor of Paphos is still angry about the museum:

The Louvre is the latest museum targeted by Sackler-related protests:

More on Egypt trying to prevent the sale of a possible Tut relic:

… related opeddish sort of thing:

… and there is much head shaking going on:

… and there might be more coming:

That recently-found Lewis Chessman piece was hyped as coming to auction, as expected:

Other items were on sale too:

… and fetched a high price (though not quite as high as hyped):

A new (?) technique for analyzing burned bones:

Applying machine learning to ‘long lost’ languages:

Latest facial reconstruction plans involve a skull found during church renovations:

Latest 3d recreations of items destroyed by ISIL:

Using DNA to track a population decline in Japan some 3000 years bp:

3000 years bp items were seized from smugglers in Iran:

Another feature on the sale of illicit antiquities on Facebook:

anonymous swiss collector:

Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues:

Illicit Cultural Property:

… and the one which should appear later today:

CBA Wessex Annual Conference (November 2019):

Taygete Atlantis excavations blogs aggregator:

Archaeology Podcast Network:

http://www.radioscribe.com/bknspade.htm
================================================================
EXPLORATOR is a free weekly newsletter bringing you the latest
news of archaeological finds, historical research and the like.
Various on-line news and magazine sources are scoured for news of
the ‘ancient world’ (broadly construed: practically anything relating
to archaeology or history up to a century or so ago is fair
game) and every Sunday they are delivered to your mailbox free of
charge!
================================================================
Useful Addresses
================================================================
Past issues of Explorator are available on the web via our
Yahoo site:

To subscribe to Explorator, send a blank email message to:

To unsubscribe, send a blank email message to:

To send a ‘heads up’ to the editor or contact him for other
reasons:

List of site sources >>>


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