History Podcasts

Robison DDG-12 - History

Robison DDG-12 - History

Robison DDG-12

Robison(DDG-12: dp. 3,370; 1. 437'; b. 47'; dr. 20'; s. 35 k.; cpl. 354;a. Tar., ASROC, 2 5", 6 21" tt.; cl. Charles F. Adams)Robison (DDG-12), a guided missile destroyer, was laid down 28 April 1959 by Defoe Shipbuilding Co., Bay City Mieh., Launched 28 April 1960, sponsored by Mrs. John H. Sides, wife of the Commander-ill-Chief, Pacific Fleet; and commissioned 9 December 1961 at the Boston Naval Shipyard, Comdr. D. V. Cox in command.Robison steamed for the west coast 29 January 1962 via the Panama Canal. On 1 March she received a message diverting her to Clipperton Island, to rescue 10 stranded seamen from the tuna boat Monarch, which had capsized 20 days earlier.Arriving at San Diego on 7 March, Robison underwent shakedown and then post-shakedown availability 14 June in San Francisco. Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz, who had twice served on Admiral Robison's staff, visited the ship on 25 June.Following completion of availability 31 July, Robison proeeeded to Mare Island for ammunition, took on ASROC and Tartar missiles at Seal Beach, and then commenced 3 months of local training operations out of San Diego. She got underway with Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla 11 on 13 November for her first WestPae tour of duty. Upon completion of this deployment, Robison arrived San Diego 21 June 1963 for coastal operations,She departed San Diego 18 November in company with Parsons (DD-949) for escort duties. Calling at Pearl Harbor 23 November, she departed 2 days later in company with Midway (CVA-41). Upon detachment from Midway, she touched at Guam, and then escorted Hancock (CVA-l9) eastward. Following fueling stops at Midway and Pearl Harbor, she arrived San Diego 19 December.In January 1964 Robison entered Long Beach Naval Shipyard for regular overhaul. After missile qualifieations and refresher training, she steamed 14 August for her second WestPae deployment. Following her successful participation in modern naval warfare training exercises and calls at various Far Eastern ports, she departed Yokosuka 24 January 1965 and arrived San Diego 6 February.Local spring operations were followed by a midshipman training cruise from 10 June to 5 August. The latter month also brought a eall at Portland, Oreg., and a visit, on the 24th, by the Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. David L. MeDonald. In the fall she sharpened her ASW, AAW, and shore bombardment techniques during coastal operations. Early in the new year 1966, the destroyer prepared for her third tour of duty in support of 7th Fleet operations in WestPac.That deployment ended with her return to San Diego 18 July 1966. Overhaul in San Francisco took her through the fall an


Captain Robert L. Lage

As a career Surface Warfare officer Captain Lage served in numerous positions around the United States and the world. His commands included The Fleet Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Center Pacific, Guided Missile Destroyer USS ROBISON (DDG 12), Fast Frigate USS BRONSTEIN (FF 1037) and Military Sea Lift Transportation Facility Casablanca, Morocco. He had three tours on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations (Pentagon). He also served as Training/Readiness Officer for Commander Naval Surface Forces Pacific. Other assignments included Commissioning Executive Officer USS WADDELL (DDG 24), Commissioning Operations Officer/ Navigator USS COONTZ (DLG 9), Operations Officer USS CARPENTER (DD 825), Gunnery/Mine Sweeping Officer USS DEXTROUS (MSF 341) and AIDE/Flag Lieutenant to Commandant Thirteenth Naval District, Seattle.

Retiring after 29 ½ years his personal awards included a Silver Star (Vietnam combat operations), two Legion of Merits (one with combat V), three Meritorious Service Medals and a Navy Unit Commendation.


Contents

Robison steamed for the west coast 29 January 1962 via the Panama Canal. On 1 March she received a message diverting her to Clipperton Island, to rescue 10 stranded seamen from the tuna boat Monarch, which had capsized 20 days earlier.

Arriving at San Diego on 7 March, Robison underwent shakedown and then post-shakedown availability 14 June in San Francisco. Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz, who had twice served on Admiral Robison's staff, visited the ship on 25 June.

Following completion of availability 31 July, Robison proceeded to Mare Island Naval Shipyard for ammunition, took on ASROC and Tartar missiles at Seal Beach, and then commenced 3 months of local training operations out of San Diego. She got underway with Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla 11 on 13 November for her first WestPac tour of duty. Upon completion of this deployment, Robison arrived San Diego 21 June 1963 for coastal operations.

She departed San Diego 18 November in company with USS Parsons (DD-949) for escort duties. Calling at Pearl Harbor 23 November, she departed 2 days later in company with USS Midway (CV-41). Upon detachment from Midway, she touched at Guam, and then escorted USS Hancock (CV-19) eastward. Following fueling stops at Midway Island and Pearl Harbor, she arrived San Diego 19 December.

In January 1964 Robison entered Long Beach Naval Shipyard for regular overhaul. After missile qualifications and refresher training, she steamed 14 August for her second WestPac deployment. Following her successful participation in modern naval warfare training exercises and calls at various Far Eastern ports, she departed Yokosuka 24 January 1965 and arrived San Diego 6 February.

Local spring operations were followed by a midshipman training cruise from 10 June to 5 August. The latter month also brought a call at Portland, Oreg., and a visit, on the 24th, by the Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. David L. McDonald. In the fall she sharpened her ASW, AAW, and shore bombardment techniques during coastal operations. Early in the new year 1966, the destroyer prepared for her third tour of duty in support of 7th Fleet operations in WestPac.

That deployment ended with her return to San Diego 18 July 1966. Overhaul in San Francisco took her through the fall and into the winter months, culminating in her return to homeport on 3 February 1967. Refresher and type training filled the next 5 months, and 25 July saw Robison once again en route to the Orient.

After calling at Pearl Harbor 31 July and Yokosuka, Japan, 5 August, she commenced Tonkin Gulf operations 25 August in the screen for USS Coral Sea (CV-43). In naval gunfire support and "Sea Dragon" operations during the period from 26 August 1967 to 9 January 1968, Robison was credited with the destruction of 78 waterborne logistics craft. Her remarkable degree of combat readiness during this period earned for her the Meritorious Unit Commendation.

Upkeep, availability, training, and operating off the west coast maintained Robison's state of readiness through the next 11 months. She steamed from San Diego for her fifth WestPac deployment on 30 December 1968 in company with carrier Kitty Hawk. The usual call at Pearl Harbor was followed by arrival at Subic Bay, 20 January 1969. After voyage repairs Robison joined Task Group 77.3 in Tonkin Gulf. The destroyer, flagship of her division, served in the screen of both Kitty Hawk and Bon Homme Richard. She also provided naval gunfire support to troops ashore in the I Corps Zone.

Robison returned to San Diego on 6 July 1969, remaining there until 2 October, when she arrived at the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, Hunters Point, for overhaul. Work was completed 4½ months later, and Robison returned to her homeport of San Diego 27 February 1970, ready for refresher training and yet another WestPac deployment.


ROBISON DDG 12

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Charles F. Adams Class Guided Missile Destroyer
    Keel Laid 28 April 1959 - Launched 27 April 1960

Naval Covers

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Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

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USS Robison (DDG 12)

USS ROBISON - the first ship in the Navy to bear the name - was the eleventh ship in the CHARLES F. ADAMS - class of guided missile destroyers and was homeported in San Diego, Ca.

Stricken from the navy list on November 20, 1992, ROBISON was sold on June 20, 1994. ROBISON earned seven battle stars for service off the Vietnamese coast.

General Characteristics: Awarded: January 17, 1958
Keel laid: April 28, 1959
Launched: April 27, 1960
Commissioned: December 9, 1961
Decommissioned: October 1, 1991
Builder: Defoe Shipbuilding, Bay City, Michigan
Propulsion system: 4 - 1200 psi boilers 2 geared turbines
Propellers: two
Length: 437 feet (133.2 meters)
Beam: 47 feet (14.3 meters)
Draft: 20 feet (6.1 meters)
Displacement: approx. 4,500 tons
Speed: 31+ knots
Aircraft: none
Armament: two Mk 42 5-inch/54 caliber guns, Mk 46 torpedoes from two Mk-32 triple mounts, one Mk 16 ASROC Missile Launcher, one Mk 11 Mod.0 Missile Launcher for Standard (MR) and Harpoon Missiles
Crew: 24 officers and 330 enlisted

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS ROBISON. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

Samuel Shelburne Robison was born on 10 May 1867 in Juniata County, Pa. He entered the Naval Academy on 4 September 1884. After finishing his academic studies at Annapolis he served the 2 years at sea as a Passed Naval Cadet in OMAHA on the Asiatic Station and was commissioned ensign 1 July 1890.

In 1891 he was transferred to BOSTON, still on the Asiatic Station and, from 1893, he served in THETIS until ordered to the Mare Island Navy Yard in 1895. In 1896 he returned to the Asiatic Station in BOSTON. In August 1899 he was assigned to the League Island Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa. He joined ALABAMA (BB 8) 15 September 1900, and 2 years later was transferred to HULL (DD 7), a torpedo boat destroyer. From September 1904 to July 1906, he served with the Bureau of Equipment at Washington, D.C., then he returned to sea, serving first in TENNESSEE (CA 10) and later in PENNSYLVANIA (ACR 4).

After a tour of duty in the Bureau of Engineering, he assumed command of CINCINNATI (C 7), a unit of the Asiatic Fleet, on 25 October 1911. Upon his return to the United States in April 1914, he became commanding officer of JUPITER (AC 3). He held the rank of captain from 1 July 1914, and he remained with JUPITER until 8 August.

On 12 October 1915 he assumed command of SOUTH CAROLINA (BB 26) and held that post until after the United States entered World War I. From July 1917 until September 1918, he commanded the Atlantic Submarine Force with additional duty as General Supervisor of all commissioned submarines in the Navy. For this duty he was awarded the Navy Cross. He was also made a Companion of the Order of the Bath for service to the British during the war.

In October 1918 he assumed command of Squadron 3, Patrol Force, and during the next month had additional duty as District Commander, Brest, France. In November, he was appointed U.S. Naval Representative on the Commission for executing the Naval Terms of the Armistice with Germany. After his return to the United States in March 1919, he commanded the Boston Navy Yard. In May 1921, he was sent to Santo Domingo as Military Governor.

A member of the General Board of the Navy from December 1922 until June 1923, he was appointed Commander in Chief, Battle Fleet, with the rank of admiral, from 30 June 1923. With SEATTLE (CA 11) as his flagship, he commanded the U.S. Fleet during the year commencing August 1925. He then became Commandant of the 13th Naval District with the permanent rank of rear admiral. From June 1928 until his retirement in June 1931, he served as Superintendent of the Naval Academy.

For a number of years after his retirement, Admiral Robison was Superintendent of the Admiral Farragut Academy, Toms River, N.J. He died in Glendale, Calif., on 20 November 1952 and was buried in the Arlington National Cemetery beside his wife, Mrs. Mary Louise Clark Robison, who had passed away in 1940.

Admiral Robison was a noted expert in the technical fields of the Navy as well as an outstanding naval commander. He published the "Manual of Radio Telegraphy and Telephone" which was regarded as the authority publication throughout the country and was published in nine editions.

USS ROBISON was laid down 28 April 1959 by Defoe Shipbuilding, Bay City, Michigan. ROBISON was launched 28 April 1960, sponsored by Mrs. John H. Sides, wife of the Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Fleet and commissioned 9 December 1961 at the Boston Naval Shipyard. San Diego was her first and only homeport.

ROBISON has made 17 deployments to the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean areas of operation and has won numerous awards for excellence and battle service. In her last year of commissioned service, she won the prestigious Battle Efficiency award for the second consecutive competitive cycle, having competed against much newer ships. ROBISON has also won the Meritorious Unit Commendation and seven battle stars for service off the coast of Vietnam.

On May 16, 1991, ROBISON completed her final extended deployment to the Southeast Pacific/Central America area conducting counter-narcotics operations. During this two-month deployment, ROBISON was directly responsible for the seizure of more than $21 million street value of cocaine. Her final series of port calls consisted of a visit to the 1991 Rose Festival in Portland, Oregon, a final ammunition offload at Indian Island, Washington, and the final overseas port of Victoria, Canada.


Social

I joined the US Navy on 10 months delayed entry when I was 17 and still in High School Nov 1976.

Left for Boot Camp in Orlando, Fl September 1977.

After boot camp I completed Basic Electricity school in Orlando Jan 1978. Data Systems ( DS ) "A" and "C" schools from Jan 1978 to April 1979 in Vallejo, CA.

I flew to the Philippines out of " C" school and waited 2 weeks for transportation to my 1st Destroyer which was in the Indian Ocean. I flew to Diego Garcia south of the Equator in the Indian Ocean. From there flew on a mail plane and landed on an Aircraft Carrier. Took a Helo from the Carrier to a supply ship then the next morning I was lowered by cable out of the Helo to the Fantail of my 1st Destroyer the USS Robison DDG 12 in the middle of the norther Indian Ocean. Where we kept tabs on the Russians who were getting ready to invade Afghanistan. During that time we had a port visit in Mombasa, Kenya where we crossed the Equator and I became a Shellback.

After leaving the Indian Ocean we headed back to the Pacific Ocean and stopped off in Singapore, Subic Bay, Philippines, Hong Kong, Yokosuka and Sasebo, Japan. Where I climbed Mt Fuji. Then after 6 months on that cruise we headed back to Hawaii when the Hostages were taken in Iran, the crew was ready to turn around and head to Iran to kick some ass but President Carter had different plans. After leaving Hawaii we headed back to our Home port of San Diego, CA in the late fall of 1979.

In the Summer of 1980 we left for my 2nd cruise on the USS Robison DDG 12 and headed for Hawaii. We couldn't pass an engineering drill so we spent 2 months in Hawaii while they rebuilt the engines. After leaving Hawaii we went to the Far East stopping in Pattaya Beach, Thailand, where I took a road trip to Bangkok. After leaving Thailand we rescued 2 boats with Vietnamese Refugees, one boat had 262 survivors on board and the other had 22. After processing them we went back to Subic Bay and Hong Kong before heading back to Hawaii to end our cruise in Jan 1981.

During 1981 I was in Bremerton, Wa in the ship yards for a major overhaul of the USS Robison DDG 12. In Sept 1981 I reenlisted for 3 more years. In the Fall of 1981 they were making the TV Movie "The Winds of War" and filming all the ship scenes on the USS Missouri BB 63 (the battleship the Japanese surrendered on). I was an extra in the movie along with 35 other shipmates. I got to spend 2 hours with Robert Mitchum, and I met Ralph Bellamy and John Dehner.

In December 1981 I left the USS Robison DDG 12 and transfered to another Destroyer the USS John Rodgers DD 983 home ported in Charleston, SC. Where in Feb 1982 I Deployed on my 3rd cruise to across the Atlantic to the Mediterranean Sea and through the Suez Canal to the Persian Gulf during the start of the Iran and Iraq war. We were protecting the shipping lanes so Iran or Iraq wouldn't blow up any oil tankers, however they did shoot each other down in nightly air dog fights. During this time we stopped in Bahrain for fuel and a few days on land in hell. We also made a port call back to Mombasa, Kenya exactly 3 years to the month I was there last on the USS Robison DDG 12. We tied up to the same dock the USS Robison DDG 12 did proving I had been completely around the world mostly on water and driving across the US. During that trip we also had a Shellback initiation. This time I was a Shellback and played Davy Jones. We had 35 Shellbacks who had to initiate 261 Pollywags. After several months in the Persian Gulf we went back through the Suez Canal to the Mediterranean Sea. Before crossing the Atlantic to head back to Charleston, SC we stopped in Malaga, Spain, where I took a road trip to Torremolimos, Spain. We also went to Trieste, Italy where i took a train to Venice, Italy. And we pulled into Naples, Italy where I took another train to Rome.

After returning to Charleston in July 1982 a month later we left on my 4th deployment through the Panama Canal to the west coast of Central America during the Contra situation. The only place we got off the ship during this 3 month cruise was Panama City before going through the Panama Canal heading west. Now that I was back in the Pacific Ocean I have now sailed completely around the world.

In the Spring of 1983 we Deployed again across the Atlantic to the Mediterranean Sea where we anchored out at Monte Carlo for the 4th of July where I had a drink with Roger Moore and Princess Caroline kissed me on the cheek. Then we went back to Malaga Spain and on the way had a change of Command.

After leaving Spain we spent the next several months 3 miles off the coast of Beirut during a peace keeping operation there. During that time we had to repel boarders as two boat came out for us one night, one was a bomb boat and the other a boarding party. After successfully doing that we headed to Ashdod, Isreal for a week were I took road trips to Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. During this time the ship that relieved us started firing their 5" guns in the hill above Beirut. We left Ashdod and went back to Beirut where we fired over 350 of our 5" rounds. Then the Battleship USS New Jersey BB 62 showed up and fired their 16" guns. We left Beirut shortly after the New Jersey got there and headed to Alexandria, Egypt. While in Egypt I took a 3 day tour to Cairo, the 3 famous pyramids and several other less famous ones.

After leaving Egypt and heading back to Charleston we got word that the Marine's barracks was blown up by 2 truck bomb killing 241 US (Marines) and 58 French Peacekeepers and 6 civilians October 23, 1983.

In January 1984 I Deployed for my 6th and final time to the North Atlantic. This was the only cruise I was on that wasn't in a war zone or we rescued refugees from another war. During this cruise we went above the Arctic Circle in Feburary with a foot of snow on our decks and got our Blue Nose. We also followed an Ice Breaker that was clearing the shipping lane to Helsinki, Finland where we played a football game against their Army personnel and beat them. We also pulled into Kiel, Germany where I took a trip to the Iron Curtain and flipped off the East German guard in his tower. We also pulled into Copenhagen, Denmark where my Great Grandfather immigrated from in the late 1800s.

After getting back to Charleston, SC in the mid Spring of 1984 we started getting ready for a major overhaul. After unloading all the weapons and 5" gun mounts we headed to Pascagoula, Mississippi to the ship yards. During this trip we were allowed to bring on an adult male family member so my Father came for the ride (Tiger Cruise). Between Charleston and Fort Lauderdale, Fl he got so sea sick that he didn't want to make the trip from Florida to Mississippi but he did and that leg wasn't very rough. This would be the last time I went out to Sea on a Navy ship.

I spent the summer of 1984 at the Ship Yards and was Honorably Discharged in August 1984.

To recap I served 10 months inactive reserves

Completed Data Systems (DS) "A" and "C" school

32 Months on the USS Robison DDG 12

32 Months on the USS John Rodgers DD 983

Rescued 284 Vietnamese refugees on 2 diffrent boats

Went throught 2 Shellback ceremonies 1 initiated 1 initiator

Ran both ditches twice each the Suez and Panama Canals

Blue Nose for crossing Arctic Circle

Received two Accommodations one from President Reagan and one from Secretary of the Navy


Contents

Robison steamed for the west coast 29 January 1962 via the Panama Canal. On 1 March she received a message diverting her to Clipperton Island, to rescue 10 stranded seamen from the tuna boat Monarch, which had capsized 20 days earlier.

Arriving at San Diego on 7 March, Robison underwent shakedown and then post-shakedown availability 14 June in San Francisco. Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz, who had twice served on Admiral Robison's staff, visited the ship on 25 June.

Following completion of availability 31 July, Robison proceeded to Mare Island Naval Shipyard for ammunition, took on ASROC and Tartar missiles at Seal Beach, and then commenced 3 months of local training operations out of San Diego. She got underway with Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla 11 on 13 November for her first WestPac tour of duty. Upon completion of this deployment, Robison arrived San Diego 21 June 1963 for coastal operations.

She departed San Diego 18 November in company with USS Parsons (DD-949) for escort duties. Calling at Pearl Harbor 23 November, she departed 2 days later in company with USS Midway (CV-41). Upon detachment from Midway, she touched at Guam, and then escorted USS Hancock (CV-19) eastward. Following fueling stops at Midway Island and Pearl Harbor, she arrived San Diego 19 December.

In January 1964 Robison entered Long Beach Naval Shipyard for regular overhaul. After missile qualifications and refresher training, she steamed 14 August for her second WestPac deployment. Following her successful participation in modern naval warfare training exercises and calls at various Far Eastern ports, she departed Yokosuka 24 January 1965 and arrived San Diego 6 February.

Local spring operations were followed by a midshipman training cruise from 10 June to 5 August. The latter month also brought a call at Portland, Oreg., and a visit, on the 24th, by the Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. David L. McDonald. In the fall she sharpened her ASW, AAW, and shore bombardment techniques during coastal operations. Early in the new year 1966, the destroyer prepared for her third tour of duty in support of 7th Fleet operations in WestPac.

That deployment ended with her return to San Diego 18 July 1966. Overhaul in San Francisco took her through the fall and into the winter months, culminating in her return to homeport on 3 February 1967. Refresher and type training filled the next 5 months, and 25 July saw Robison once again en route to the Orient.

After calling at Pearl Harbor 31 July and Yokosuka, Japan, 5 August, she commenced Tonkin Gulf operations 25 August in the screen for USS Coral Sea (CV-43). In naval gunfire support and "Sea Dragon" operations during the period from 26 August 1967 to 9 January 1968, Robison was credited with the destruction of 78 waterborne logistics craft. Her remarkable degree of combat readiness during this period earned for her the Meritorious Unit Commendation.

Upkeep, availability, training, and operating off the west coast maintained Robison's state of readiness through the next 11 months. She steamed from San Diego for her fifth WestPac deployment on 30 December 1968 in company with carrier Kitty Hawk. The usual call at Pearl Harbor was followed by arrival at Subic Bay, 20 January 1969. After voyage repairs Robison joined Task Group 77.3 in Tonkin Gulf. The destroyer, flagship of her division, served in the screen of both Kitty Hawk and Bon Homme Richard. She also provided naval gunfire support to troops ashore in the I Corps Zone.

Robison returned to San Diego on 6 July 1969, remaining there until 2 October, when she arrived at the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, Hunters Point, for overhaul. Work was completed 4½ months later, and Robison returned to her homeport of San Diego 27 February 1970, ready for refresher training and yet another WestPac deployment.


Operation Lion’s Den

Many Americans probably believed that by 1972, the war in Vietnam was essentially winding down. However, for the U.S. Navy in Vietnam, 1972 would prove to be a busy year of conducting numerous and dangerous combat operations.

On August 27, 1972. Operation Lion’s Den, or the Battle of Haiphong Harbor, occurred, which involved one of the few ship-to-ship naval battles of the Vietnam War. The operation was carried out by four ships designated as Task Unit 77.1.2., which included USS Newport News (CA 148), an 8-inch gun cruiser USS Providence (CLG 6), a 6-inch gun missile cruiser USS Robison (DDG 12), a guided-missile destroyer and USS Rowan (DD 782). Admiral James L. Holloway III, the Seventh Fleet commander, also participated as an observer on Newport News.

USS Newport News (CA 148) opens fire with her 8-inch/55 caliber main guns on targets in Vietnam in 1972. U.S. Navy Photograph #1151898. Public domain.

The two cruisers and two destroyers conducted a brief night raid against the North Vietnamese forces protecting the port of Haiphong. This operation was a naval gunfire strike against targets in Haiphong, Do Son Peninsula and Cat Ba area. The purpose of the raid was to knock out coastal defense and SAM (surface-to-air missile) sites as well as other military targets in the vicinity of Haiphong Harbor or the “Lion’s Den,” as called by the Navy.

Approaches to Haiphong, Do Son Peninsula and Cat Ba Island area. USS Providence (CLG 6), a 6-inch gun missile cruiser.*

Vietnamese coastal defense gunfire were heavy during the attack. Newport News reported 75 rounds of very accurate hostile fire Rowan reported 50 rounds of accurate fire as close as 20 yards and straddling the ship. Robison reported 140 rounds of very accurate fire, the closest being 15 yards off the port beam. Providence counted 60 incoming rounds.

Artwork by Dale Byhre. USS Rowan (DD 782) astern of USS Newport News (CA 148).[1] USS Robison (DDG 12), a guided-missile destroyer.*

Newport News ceased firing at 2333 and prepared to egress from the area. Captain Zartman the Commanding Officer of Newport News, informed Holloway that all of the ship’s targets “had been covered” and that secondary explosions were noted at Cat Ba airfield and an ammunition dump. A short period after cease fire, Combat Information Center (CIC) reported a surface target, designated Skunk Alpha, at 10,000 yards bearing 088 degrees, heading for Newport News at high speed.”

P-6-class Soviet-manufactured fast patrol boats had waited to ambush Newport News in the vicinity of Ile de Norway. Numerous rocks and pinnacles near the island made it difficult for Newport News’ radars to lock onto the patrol boat. The patrol boat’s relative bearing was also dead ahead, making it impossible for the cruiser’s 8-inch guns to fire a low angle shot (an electronics antenna on the forecastle blocked such shots).

Newport News swung hard to the starboard to unmask the battery and commence firing. Within minutes, the contact appeared to be on fire. CIC then informed the bridge of two additional patrol boats 16,000 yards dead ahead. Newport News came hard port to bring its guns to bear on the new targets—a heading that now put the ship on a collision course with the shoals of Ile de Norway.

The zigzagging approach of the patrol boats combined with darkness and the confusing effect of the cruiser’s own fire made it difficult for the 21,000-ton ship to sink these tiny targets. When a call came in from Providence about a possible fourth contact, Holloway told Zartman that he was going to call in air support. “Attention any Seventh Fleet aircraft in the vicinity of Haiphong,” Holloway announced on a special Navy frequency reserved for such emergencies, “This is Blackbeard (Seventh Fleet Commanders’ personal call sign) himself aboard USS Newport News with a shore bombardment force in Haiphong Harbor. We are engaged with several surface units and need some illumination to help us sort things out.”[2][3]…To read “Striking Eight Bells,” use one of these links to booksellers: Amazon.com: Books, Barnes and Noble Booksellers, BAM –Books A Million, Smashword.com eBooks, goodreads and Thriftbooks.

  • ©2018 George Trowbridge

The stories in these posts and the book “Striking Eight Bells: A Vietnam Memoir,” reflect the author’s recollection of events. Some names, locations, and identifying characteristics have been changed to protect the privacy of those depicted. Dialogue has been recreated from memory. Dates, times, and locations were recreated from declassified U.S. Navy records and others. Photographs used are either public domain or owned by the author. Illustrations and maps used were either created by the author or in the public domain. The stories in these posts and the book are solely the opinion of the author and not the publisher, Richter Publishing, LLC.

*Image was found in public domain or it could not be established after reasonable search, that any claim existed to the image. Image used for illustrative purposes only and is not the property of the author. Where ever possible credit for the image is indicated in the caption.


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Product Description

USS Robison DDG12

1964-65 Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A Great Part of Naval History.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Robison cruise book during this period of time. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed.

Some items in this book:

The CD book includes 96 pages of pictures of its crew and ports of call.

Additional Bonus:

  • Six minute audio recording of " Sounds of Boot Camp " during the late 50's early 60's.
  • 2 Minute video of a destroyer (DDG 6) in heavy seas

Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

  • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
  • Self contained CD no software to load.
  • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
  • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
  • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
  • Viewing options are described in the help section.
  • Bookmark your favorite pages.
  • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
  • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
  • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.


Our Newsletter

Product Description

USS Robison DDG 12

Commissioned 9 December 1961

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS Robison DDG 12 Commissioning Program. The pages are Hi-Resolution in PDF format. The pages can be printed from the CD. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label.

Some of the items included in this program:

Over 21 pictures 28 pages.

Thanks for your Interest!

This CD is for your personal use only

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Watch the video: 0412151980Aboard the USS Robison, DDG-12 (January 2022).