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Ariksaka Model 1905 Rifle (Meji 38th Year Type)

Ariksaka Model 1905 Rifle (Meji 38th Year Type)

Ariksaka Model 1905 Rifle (Meji 38th Year Type)

The Japanese were to use rifles throughout the Second World War which were heavily based on the Model 1905 bolt action rifle which had served them during the First World War. The rifle was known as the Ariksaka which was the name of a Japanese Colonel who was head of the working group which designed the rifle. Even though the rifle was to see Japanese service for 40 years it was far from a revolutionary design, being in the main part a copy of a Mauser 98K rifle. It was a 6.5mm weapon which by 1940 was showing its age as on the battlefield of the time it lacked range, accuracy and penetrating power. This was noticed by the Japanese when fighting in Manchuria in the 1930s but although plans were in place to upgrade it to a 7.7mm weapon the 6.5mm remained in service for the whole of World War 2.

The model which saw service in the Pacific theatre was the Type Meji 38 (as 1905 was the 38th year since the reign of the Emperor Meji). It had a 5 round internal magazine, an awkward bolt action (a relic of the Mauser design), it was distinguished by a huge bayonet which was nearly half the length of the weapon. Most weapons were in a carbine format; a rifle version was produced and saw service but without any thought to the differing roles of carbine and long rifle.

Length: 50.25in (127cm)
Unloaded weight: 9lbs 8oz (4.31kg)
Muzzle velocity: 2400ft/sec (730m/sec)


Arisaka Type 38 short rifle

The Arisaka Type 38 (Rifle, Meiji 38th Year) was the standard rifle issued to the Imperial Japanese infantry by the time of the fighting of World War 1 (1914-1918). The rifle had an inherently high accuracy rate and proved very reliable in even the most adverse conditions found on the modern battlefield - particularly in the jungle fighting of. The Arisaka Type 38 6.5mm rifle was also made in a short version with an overall length to 44.5 inches and weighing less at 8.5 pounds. Some of these Type 38 shorts were issued to infantry, particularly later in the war, but most went to soldiers of supporting arms and logistic services The Japanese Arisaka Type 38 and 99 rifles are among the best bolt action rifles fielded during WWII. What I find interesting is that so many people consider.. Collecting and Shooting the Arisaka Type 38 Rifle - Rifle Disassembly and Reassembly. Page 25 of 27. 72) Push down on the floor plate until is locks in place. 73) Reinstall the bolt/receiver cover back onto the bolt. 74) Figure 74 shows the left hand receiver cover groove. Collecting and Shooting the Arisaka Type 38 Rifle - Rifle Disassembly.

This rifle uses the typical Type 38 action & rear sight but the butt plate, front of the stock, bands, bayonet lug & front sight are taken from the Chinese made M1907 Mauser rifle. Of the 5 rifles reported to the authors of The Type 38 Arisaka one had a one piece stock instead of the normal Japanese style 2 piece Two 6.5x50mm carbines were fielded by the IJA. The Type 38 carbine was simply a Type 38 rifle with a shortened 19-inch barrel and a weight of 7.5 pounds. The Type 38 carbine in my collection has an open rear sight with graduations from 400 to 2,000 meters. Some Type 38 carbines were issued with the same peep sight arrangement mentioned above In the late 1930's the Japanese developed a rifle to compete in 'Modern Warfare'. It was a redesign of the Type 38 in a larger caliber, 7.7 Japanese. These rifles include: The Type 99 Long Rifle, the Type 99 Short Rifle, the Type 99 Carbine, the Type 99 Naval Special, the Type 100 Paratroop Rifle, and the Type 2 Paratroop Rifle The Arisaka rifles were designated with the year of the current emperor's reign. Thus, the Type 38 rifle was designed in the 38th year of the reign of Emperor Meiji (1905), and the Type 44 carbine was adopted in the 44th year of his reign (1911). During the reign of Hirohito, rifles were designated by the last one or two digits of the adoption.

. Has no MUM, and has writing. JAPANESE TYPE 38 ARISAKA, 6.5 X 51 CAL MILITARY RIFLE, 20BBL, NO MUM OR DUST COVER, EJECTORS, SINGLE TRIGGER, MEDIUM DARK WALNUT, 1/2 GRIP, LOP 13 1/8, 7LBS 7OZ,. The most common of the Arisaka rifles are the Type 38 and Type 99. Here is a comparison shot of the Type 38 Infantry Rifle and Type 99 Short Rifle together, with a metre stick (one metre =39 inches) below for scale. As can be seen, the Type 38 Infantry Rifle is quite a bit longer than the Type 99 short rifle

Arisaka Type 38 Bolt-Action Infantry Service Rifle

  • The Type 38 rifle Arisaka(三八式歩兵銃,san-hachi-shiki hoheijū?) was a bolt-action rifle that was the standard infantry rifle of the Imperial Japanese Army from 1905 (the 38th year of the Meiji period, hence Type 38) to the end of World War II. 1 History and development 2 Description and variant types 2.1 Type 38 carbine 2.2 Type 44 carbine 2.3 Type 97 Sniper Rifle 2.4 Type I Rifle 3.
  • The Type 99 was produced in four versions, the regular issue Type 99 Short Rifle, the Type 99 Long Rifle (a limited production variant), the take-down Type 2 Paratroop Rifle, and the Type 99 Sniper Rifle. The standard rifle also came with a wire monopod and an anti-aircraft sighting device. The Type 99 was the first mass-produced infantry rifle.
  • Origins: The Type 38 Rifle The Meiji 38th Year rifle (Type 38) A new cartridge was soon under development and ultimately became the 7.7x58mm Arisaka round. After a short period of testing using modified Type 38 rifles and ironing out of teething issues, the Type 99 was born. The Type 99 appeared in 1939 and was similar to the Meiji 38th.

TWO JAPANESE ARISAKA BOLT ACTION RIFLES:TWO JAPANESE ARISAKA BOLT ACTION RIFLES: the first a type 38 long rifle, 6.5x50SR Arisaka caliber, 31 1/4 barrel, serial #946037 next a type 99 short Arisaka Type 99 Bolt-action Rifle and Bayonet: Arisaka Type 99 Bolt-action Rifle and Bayonet: Arisaka Type 99 Bolt-action Rifle and Bayonet, c. 1940s. The Arisaka Rifle was the official service bolt action rifle for the Imperial Japanese Armed Forces from 1897 to 1945. The First Model of the Arisaka Rifle was designed by Colonel Nariakira Arisaka in 1897. There are five major variants - the Type 30, 35, 38, 44, and the 99 This is a very rare example of a early WWII experimental Calvary rifle that was converted from a regular type rifle into a short rifle configuration. This was Japan's attempt to produce a calvary/short rifle prior to the actual adoption of the later Type 44 Calvary carbine. A general description of this conversion entailed pulling rifles from stock, shipping them to the Chigusa factory under. Japanese Military Type 38 Arisaka Bolt Action Rifles: 1923 - 1940 Click Here To See: Close Up Image Of Rifle. The below parts have been removed from a large batch of Type 38 Arisaka rifles that were manufactured at the Kokura, Nagoya and Mukden (Manchuria) Arsenals Type 38 Arisaka Short Rifle with Kanji Gents, Here is a nice thread for you to ponder (or not). Here is a nice Japanese rifle that I picked up a number of years ago. The label says, Type 38 Short Rifle. I dropped on a repop sling to make carrying it around easier. The dust cover (and I assume bolt) don't match the rifle, but they have been.

The Arisaka Rifle: Weapons for the Imperial Japanese Army

The Arisaka rifle (有坂銃 Arisaka-jū) is a family of Japanese militarybolt-actionservice rifles, in production and use since approximately 1897, when it replaced the Murata rifle (村田銃 Murata-jū) family, until the end of World War II in 1945.The most common specimens include the Type 38 chambered for the 6.5×50mmSR Type 38 cartridge, and the Type 99 chambered for the 7.7×58mm Type. Contact Us. Numrich Gun Parts Corporation 226 Williams Ln. Kingston, NY 12401 Phone: 866.686.742 There are T-38 and T-99 type training rifles . They were made to train people to operate real T-38 or T-99 rifles , so were made to look the same but do not have real rifle parts . No training rifles were ever made to fire live ammo . Most School rifles can fire live ammo . They were once real rifles pulled from service

WWII Era Japanese Type 99 Arisaka Rifle Short Cleaning Rod - Reproduction. $10.99. $7.99 shipping. Arisaka Type 38 Front Band Spring Cleaning Rod Retainer Assembly. $17.99. $5.80 shipping. Japanese Arisaka T38 Rifle Front Band/Cleaning Rod Retainer. $29.99. 0 bids. $4.00 shipping. Ending Nov 29 at 7:00PM PST 3d 4h The type 38 is a Mauser style action and is reported to be very strong. Some testing in the 1950's by the NRA was interesting. I have an awful example of a Type 38 that was bubba'd and rechambered to 6.5 x 257 Roberts. I've since removed the barrel and am trying to decide whether or not to just sell the action and stock I have and wash my hands Showing and shooting a WWII Japanese rifle, the Arisaka. A friend asked me if I would want to do a video with this gun, and I thought that anything of WWII. Great deals on Type 38 Rifle In Rifle Parts. Trick out or upgrade your firearm with the largest gun parts selection at eBay.com. Fast & Free shipping on many items

Japanese Type 38 and Type 99 Arisaka rifles - YouTub

Introduced to service in 1939, the Type 99 was chambered for the 7.7x58mm Japanese cartridge. With a .312-inch bore, it was nominally a .30-caliber rifle intended to replace the 6.5x50 cartridge in Japan's Type 38 rifle. War stress curtailed the transition, and both battled through the war The Arisaka (有坂銃 Arisaka-jū) is a family of Japanese bolt-action rifles designed by Baron Nariakira Arisaka produced from 1897 to 1945 by a variety of arsenals in Japan and other countries.1 Developed to replace the old Murata rifle, the rifle was designed by Nariakira Arisaka with improvements by Kijirō Nambu and Gen. Giichi Dōgane over its lifespan. 1 History 2 Design Details 3. Neat rifle. It's an Arisaka Type 38 in 6.5x50mmSR caliber. The chrysanthemum crest normally present just ahead of the gas relief holes atop the receiver is missing, and the markings aren't those of a typical Type 38. The front sight is lacking the protective ears usually seen on 38s, so my guess (and that's all it is) is that your rifle's an.

Development of the Type 99 rifle was the product of an evolution that began with the adoption of Nariakira Arisaka's Type 30 in 1897, and continued with the adoption of Kijirō Nambu's Type 38. 6.5×50 Japanese. From left to right, standard Type 38 Arisaka 6.5X50SR round, early round-nosed Type 30 6.5 round, wooden bullet blank, paper blank, gallery round with short flat projectile, gallery round with round lead ball. The trainers used the two gallery cartridges on the right-hand end of the photo Nambu Type 14 Pistol: Pistole (P.38) Tokarev TT-33 Pistol: Rifle Sections: AK-47: Argentine 1891 Rifle: Argentine 1909 Carbine: Arisaka Type 38: Arisaka Type 99: Carcano Model 38: Carcano Model 1891/41: CETME: Civil Guard, M1916: CZ BRNO 98/22: CZ BRNO Vz24: Egyptian Hakim: Enfield No. 4: Enfield No. 5 Carbine: FAL: Finnish m/28: Finnish m/39.

ARISAKA TYPE 38.pdf Rifle Firearm Component

Type 38 +Bayonet Type 38 +Type 2 Rifle Grenade Discharger Type 97 Sniper Rifle Ammo: 6.5×50mmSR Arisaka *5 Features: ・Low power, but high initial velocity and low recoil. ・Quick reload of veteran soldiers. ・Craftmanship of detail the safety switch. ・Japanese spirit Feedback is always welcome! < > Barrel Dimensions: Point A = 1 1/4 and Point B = 23/32 Center to Center of Action Screws: 6 59/64 Over All Length of Part: 31 1/2 Comes with Boyds' 1/2 Rubber Recoil Pad. ATTENTION CUSTOMERS: Our stocks do not utilize the handguard, the upper receiver tang, or the rear floor plate tang brackets. Drop set for scope mount use. The barrel channel is cut for the original military barrel

Japanese Arisaka Type 38 Short Rod. Japanese Type 99 Long Rifle Cleaning Rod, @29 3/16 $17.95. more info Quick view Add to Cart. Japanese Arisaka Type 38 Dust Cover Repro, Excellent. $45.00 more info Quick view. Japanese Type 38 and Type 99 Proper Hook Quillion Bayonet with Scabbard. Japanese Type 38 Arisaka Cavalry Rifle REF. Japanese Type 38 Arisaka Rifle #12414. Price $695.00 Price $24.00 Japanese Type 99 Arisaka Cleaning Rod Short ORIGINAL. Price $58.00 Japanese Type 99 Arisaka Rifle Last Ditch #80335. Price $525.00 Japanese Type 99 Arisaka Rifle Last Ditch REF. Japanese Type 99 Front Band Assembly 3 Screw Type They have very poor quality control. Grafs does not make that ammo they just offer it for sale, but it is made by PCI in Hobart, Indiana Grafs does not load or sell their own, or Hornady-made ammo for the Type 38 or the Type 99 Arisaka. The PCI ammo is crap quality that can damage your rifle

Arisaka1 - Carbines for Collector

  1. Re: Air soft, Type 38 Arisaka Post by 72 usmc » Sun Aug 30, 2020 11:35 pm Or for just a wee bit more of that dirty germ infested Covid 19 cash, lots of the crew has cash in a corner, how about a Type 97 SNIPER at $1400
  2. Early Arisaka Type 38 School Rifle Arisaka Type 38 Serial 265915 Early No-Series, late 1910s-early1920s Koishikawa Arsenal (Tokyo) 1870-1935. This rifle is 'loaded' with history from the Japanese Imperial period. After World War I the Empire of Japan continued to expand its influence in Southeast Asia. Around the time this rifle was.
  3. Arisaka Type 38 I recently was given this rifle by my brother in law who was given this rifle by his brother a collector of militaria. Since I have had time on my hands I stripped and oiled a battle encrusted stock, shrapnel gouges a small split repair at the dove tail in the rear caused by another sharp pointed object
  4. Description: On consignment we have a Japanese Type38Arisakarifle in 6.5 Jap. This rifle is in original military configuration featuring wood military stock with steel buttplate, receiver with Mum and 31.25 barrel. Numbers are mismatched, gun is missing cleaning rod, no import marks

Arisaka Rifles & Carbines RifleMagazin

  • Type 38 rifle From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Type 38 rifle Arisaka was a bolt-action rifle. For a time it was the standard rifle of the Japanese infantry. It was reliable and accurate. It was known also as the Type 38 Year Meiji Carbine in Japan
  • This is a very nice Japanese Type 38 Arisaka training rifle made during WWII. Mechanically this rifle works as it should. However, this rifle is a non shooter and should not be fired with live 6.5mm ammunition under any circumstances. This is a great example of the Japanese training rifle and even comes with a very nice original canvas sling
  • japanese type 38 arisaka 6.5 x 51 cal military rifle description: japanese type 38 arisaka, 6.5 x 51 cal military rifle, 20bbl, no mum or dust cover, ejectors, single trigger, medium dark walnut, 1/2 grip, lop 13 1/8, 7lbs 7oz, blade front, elevator rear, excellent original blue & bore

Issued in long and short versions - the latter for cavalry and specialists - the Type 30 was the first main Arisaka model, arming Imperial Japan's forces during the Russo-Japanese War, though after the war it was refined into the Type 38, which would still be in use in 1945. Type 30 Arisaka Manufacturers Arisaka Type 38. Arisaka Type 38. Parts List. Sort by: 0 Schematic w/ Parts List 1 Extractor 2 Extractor Collar 3 Bolt 4 & 6 Firing Pin & Safety Knob Set 4 Firing Pin.

Type 26 Revolver · Type 30 rifle · Arisaka 38 · Type 44 Cavalry Rifle Osztrák-Magyar Monarchia Steyr Mannlicher M1894 · Mannlicher M1895 · Mannlicher-Schönauer · Schwarzlose MG M.07/12 · Flammenwerfer M.1 I've been trying to find the twist rate of a Type 38 Japanese Arisaka. It is a 6.5x50mm rifle I had re chambered for 6.5x55mm Swedish. I know I can probably do the old cleaning rod/count the turns trick, but I typically get erroneous results

Castle-Thunder.com: Japanese Arisaka Rifle Identificatio

  1. Nambu World: Type 30 Arisaka Rifles. The Type 30 rifle, the first of the Arisaka series, was the primary Japanese infantry weapon used in the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05. The design effort which led to it was led by a Japanese military officer, Col. Nariaki Arisaka
  2. The 38 and 99 were two of the most commonly-used Japanese rifles during the Second World War. Altogether, there were about 10 models (or 'types') within the Arisaka service rifle series. The original rifle (Type 30) was designed by Arisaka Nariakira and Nambu Kijirō, in 1897
  3. The Type 99 rifle Arisaka or Type 99 short rifle(九九式短小銃,Kyū-kyū-shiki tan-shōjū?) was a bolt-action rifle of the Arisaka design used by the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II. 1 History 1.1 Other users 2 Design 3 Gallery 4 Availability 5 Users 6 References 7 External links During the Second Sino-Japanese War in the 1930s, the Japanese soon found that the 8×57mm IS.
  4. Only the long rifle was in the scope of the agreement: no short rifle or carbine of Arisaka Carcano model are known. It is known that Beretta realized an interesting prototype using the Mauser magazine instead of the Mannlicher system and based upon the short rifle model 38, chambered for the 7.35x51 cartridge
  5. S&T Type 38 infantry rifle air cocking model. Real wood stock with a oil finish. The Magazine is a short type inserted on the bottom of the gun and holds 26 rounds

Development of the Type 99 service rifle was the product of an evolution that began with the adoption of Nariakira Arisaka's Type 30 in 1897, and continued with the adoption of Kijirō Nambu's. Issued in long and short versions - the latter for cavalry and specialists - the Type 30 was the first main Arisaka model, arming Imperial Japan's forces during the Russo-Japanese War, though after the war it was refined into the Type 38, which would still be in use in 1945. The main Arisaka rifle of World War II though was the Type 99

Arisaka Type 38 Bolt Action Rifle Prop And When To Use Vpn Concentrator is best in online store Re: Arisaka Type 30 Post by nrobertb » Mon Oct 23, 2017 2:22 am The Type 30 and Type 38 rifles take the 6.5 Jap cartridge and the Type 99 rifle takes the 7.7 Jap cartridge

Markings on Japanese Arisaka Rifles and Bayonets of World

The two-piece Arisaka stock, straight bolt handle and the unwieldy Type 38 barrel were retained, giving it the outward appearance of a Japanese service rifle. Students of both Italian and Japanese World War II battle rifles have found much to admire in the Type I, which stands for Italian, by the way, and is not a numeric designation From top to bottom Arisaka Type 38 Rifle Arisaka Type 99 Rifle Nambu Type 14 Pistol Arisaka Type 30 Bayonet Type 98 Officer's Shin-Gunto Type 95 NCO's Shin-Gunto. Military Weapons Firearms Shotguns Anatomy Survival Japanese Rifles Afghanistan Vintage Cars Development of the Type 99 service rifle was the product of an evolution that began with the adoption of Nariakira Arisaka's Type 30 in 1897, and continued with the adoption of Kijirō Nambu's Type 38 in 1906. Both of those rifles fired the 6.5×50 mm Japanese smokeless cartridge that, by the 1930s, was demonstrating some shortcomings in.

Military Rifles - Japanese - Arisaka for sal

1 review for Japanese Arisaka Type 99 Short Rifle Cleaning Rod. Japanese Arisaka Type 38 Ammo Pouches, Leather Belt, Bayonet Frog and Rear Ammo Pouch $ 64.99. Rated 5 out of 5. Quick View. Compare. Our Customer Guarentee. World War Supply strives to provide the most accurate and quality products available. If you are not satisfied with your. Oct 12, 2016 - arisaka rifle slings | Pvt. Ando ( Masahiko Tanimura ) fires his Arisaka Type 99 short rifle #Best Highlight #1 Shop for Low Price 6 5 Italian Bolt Action Rifle And Arisaka Type 38 Spring Powered Bolt Action Rifle

Nambu Worl

How to get Aqurite Long Shot Simi Automatic Military Rifle And Arisaka Type 38 L The Type 30 Arisaka (三十年式歩兵銃 Sanjū-nen-shiki hoheijū, lit. 30th year infantry rifle) was a Japanese bolt-action rifle designed by Baron Nariakira Arisaka in 1897 and produced by the Tokyo Arsenal from 1897 to 1905. The first iteration of the Arisaka rifle, the Type 30 acted as the Japanese service rifle from 1897 to 1905. 1 History 2 Design Details 3 Ammunition 4 Variants 5. Successor to the Type 38 rifle. Chambered in 7.7×58mm Type 99, later rimless variants of the Type 92 and 97 cartridges also usable. Designed in 1939, then produced and fielded from 1941 to 1945, the Type 99 was the most common Imperial Japanese service rifle of World War II and second most produced Imperial rifle with 2,500,000 built. Significant changes are the improvement of the rear sight.


Design Details [ edit | edit source ]

The Type 38 is a bolt-action rifle with a five-round internal box magazine fed by stripper clips. The Type 38 was able to mount scopes, with the most common being a Type 5 optic. Ζ]

Notable improvements of the Type 38 over the Type 30 include a simplified bolt, simplified manufacture and the addition of a dust cover based on experiences with the weapon in the Russo-Japanese War. Η] The rifle could also fit the Type 30 bayonet as used on the Type 30 Arisaka.


Ariksaka Model 1905 Rifle (Meji 38th Year Type) - History

Markings on Japanese Arisaka Rifles and Bayonets of World War II

Adapted from Japanese Rifles of World War II , by Duncan O. McCollum, 1996, published by Excalibur Publications, PO Box 36, Latham, NY 12110-0036, USA, ISBN: 1-880677-11-3 and Military Rifles of Japan , by Fred. L. Honeycutt, Jr., and F. Patt Anthony, Fifth Edition, 1996, published by Julin Books, 5282 Ridan Way, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418, ISBN: 0-9623208-7-0. Bayonet information from Bayonets from Janzen's Notebook , by Jerry L. Janzen, published by Cedar Ridge Publications, 73 Cedar Ridge Road, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74011-1142, USA. ISBN: 0-9619789-1-0.

Table of bayonet variations added 09/07/2000.

Production figures added 08/05/2000.

Spelling of Col. Arisaka's name updated 06/25/2000, based on information supplied by his great-granddaughter.

Markings on Japanese Arisaka Rifles and Bayonets of World War II

The Japanese manufactured over 6.4 million rifles and carbines in the 40 years from 1906 to 1945. Most of these rifles were still in use during the Sino-Japanese War of the 1930s and the Pacific War of the 1940s. During the war and subsequent American occupation of Japan, thousands of these rifles found their way to the United States as war souvenirs, making them one of the most common foreign military firearms available in the country.

The Arisaka rifles are named for Colonel Nariaki Nariakira Arisaka, who headed a commission during the 1890s which was charged with developing a new rifle to replace the earlier models such as the Murata. The Arisaka rifles were designated with the year of the current emperor's reign. Thus, the Type 38 rifle was designed in the 38th year of the reign of Emperor Meiji (1905), and the Type 44 carbine was adopted in the 44th year of his reign (1911). During the reign of Hirohito, rifles were designated by the last one or two digits of the adoption year according to the standard Japanese calendar. Thus, the Type 99 rifle was adopted in Japanese calendar year 2599 (1939), and the Type 2 paratroop rifle was adopted in calendar year 2602 (1942).

A chrysanthemum with 16 petals (the symbol of the Japanese Emperor) was usually stamped on the receiver of rifles manufactured for the Imperial Japanese Army, indicating that the rifle belonged to the Emperor. The chrysanthemum resembles this:

The chrysanthemum was at least partially ground off on rifles which were surrendered after the war, apparently as a face-saving gesture. Rifles captured in the field, however, normally have the chrysanthemum symbol intact. The Type designation was stamped into the top of the receiver using the character shiki for "type" and Japanese numerals. The shiki character and the characters for the Japanese numerals are shown in the following table.

Japanese Characters Used on Arisaka Rifles
Character Meaning
Type
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

A small number of Type 38 and Type 99 rifles had two concentric circles on the receiver in place of the chrysanthemum. The purpose of these specially-marked rifles is not known, although it is speculated that they were issued to paramilitary forces such as the Kempei Tai (Japanese Secret Police), other military police, and guards at prisons, embassies, and other civil instillations. Some concentric circle rifles were remarked standard issue Type 38 and Type 99 rifles that had the chrysanthemum completely or partially removed and replaced with the concentric circle marking. These rifles were serialized separately from regular production pieces. Other rifles apparently were originally manufactured and marked with concentric circles, which looks something like this:

Each Japanese rifle was marked with the symbol of either the arsenal of manufacture or the arsenal that supervised the manufacturing subcontractor. This mark can be found on the left side of the receiver at the end of the rifle serial number. Rifles manufactured by a commercial subcontractor bear the subcontractor's mark to the right of the supervising arsenal's mark. These marks are shown in the following table.

Japanese Rifle Manufacturers
Symbol Arsenal/Subcontractor Period of Operation
Koishikawa Arsenal (Tokyo) 1870-1935
Kokura Arsenal 1935-1945
Nagoya Arsenal 1923-1945
Jinsen Arsenal (Korea) 1923-1945
Mukden Arsenal (Manchuria) 1931-1945
Toyo Kogyo 1939-1945
Tokyo Juki Kogyo 1940-1945
Tokyo Juki Kogyo 1940-1945
Howa Jyuko 1940-1945
Izawa Jyuko 1940-1945

At various times, rifles were removed from military service and sold to other countries or transferred to Japanese schools as training weapons. Normally, the chrysanthemum on these rifles was overstamped with the Koishikawa (Tokyo) / Kokura Arsenal symbol or a ring of small circles to indicate that the rifle no longer belonged to the Imperial Japanese Army. Rifles given to schools often have an additional character stamped on the top of the receiver between the chrysanthemum and the type designation characters. Most of these "school-marked" rifles also have two or three zeros preceeding the serial number. The "school" mark looks something like this:

All Japanese military rifles had serial numbers except extremely rare prototypes, other pre-production guns, and occasional rifles assembled very late in World War II. The serial number was stamped on the left side of the receiver, followed by the arsenal symbol. Initially, rifles make in Japanese arsenals were numbered consecutively within each Type designation. In 1933 this scheme was replaced by a system in which rifles were numbered in blocks, or series, of 99,999 each [actually 100,000, according to Honeycutt, running from serial numbers 0 through 99,999]. Each series was identified by a small Japanese character (kana) placed within a circle to the left of the serial number. Specific blocks of kana were assigned to each arsenal or manufacturer to use for a specific rifle type. The series markings are illustrated in the following table.

Series Markings
Series Number Series Mark Series Number Series Mark
1 24
2 25
3 26
4 27
5 28
6 29
7 30
8 31
9 32
10 33
11 34
12 35
20 37
21 40
22 45
23

The following table, based on information from McCollum's and Honeycutt's books, provides some information about rifle production at the various arsenals, organized by type of rifle. These figures are only estimates, and are based on recorded serial number information. Blank entries indicate that the information in the entry immediately above applies to the blank entry as well.

Production information for sniper rifles, paratroop rifles (Types 100 and 2), Test Type 1 rifles, and Type I rifles (produced by Italy for the Japanese Navy and not based totally on the Arisaka action) are not included.

  1. Koishikawa switched from "B" to "S" barrel proof mark in the late 800,000 serial number range.
  2. Rifles in this series have been observed with (i) mum removed and either an elongated M or the school mark substituted, or (ii) mum overstamped by the Nagoya symbol, an elongated M, or other characters. The elongated M indicates "military reserves".
  3. Some rifles have been reported stamped with the character signifying "for education" (not to be confused with the school mark).
  4. Serial numbers in this range are preceded by two hiragana characters for "i" and "ro", the first two characters in the Japanese syllabary. These characters resemble "w" and "3", and these serial numbers have been misidentified as being in the 300,000 range.
  5. These rifles will normally be found stamped with a symbol similar to the series mark for "4" stamped underneath the receiver or on the barrel, indicating a second class arm.
  6. Carbines with a shallow "00" or "000" stamped in front of the serial number have been removed from service use.
  7. Koishikawa switched from the "B" to the "S" barrel proof mark in the late 20,000 serial number range.
  8. "T" proof mark stamped on barrel at receiver.

The bayonets were normally serial numbered, but the serial numbers were assigned independently from those assigned to the rifles.

Symbols indicating the arsenals at which the bayonets were manufactured, or the arsenal that supervised the subcontractor, are stamped on the right ricasso. These markings are identified in the following table:

Japanese Bayonet Arsenal Marks
Symbol Arsenal/Subcontractor
Tokyo Arsenal prior to 1936
Kokura Arsenal 1936-45
Nagoya Arsenal
Jinsen Arsenal (Korea)
Mukden Arsenal (Manchuria)
National Denki (National Electric)
Unknown
Unknown company under Kokura supervision
National Denki under Kokura supervision
Howa Jyuko under Nagoya supervision
Unknown company under Nagoya supervision
Toyoda Jidoshoki Seisakusho (Toyoda Automatic Loom Works) under Nagoya supervision
Unknown company under Nagoya supervision

The variations are too numerous to illustrate here, but the following table (lifted from Honeycutt) lists the more commonly found variations. The abbreviations are listed below the table. My references do not list any production information for the many variations.

Typical Type 30 Bayonet Variations
Arsenal Mark Blade Finish Fullers Crossguard Shape Grip Shape Grip Fasteners Pommel Shape
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Blue Yes SC C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Blue Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Blue No SC CWA Rivet R
Blue No SC S Rivet R
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Bright Yes SC C Screw BHC
Blue Yes SC C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Blue Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Bright Yes SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue Yes SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue No SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue No SC S Rivet BHF
Bright Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Blue Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Bright Yes SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue Yes SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue No SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue No SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue No SC S Rivet BHF
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Bright Yes SC C Screw BHC
Blue Yes SC C Screw BHC
Blue Yes SC CWA Rivet R
Blue No SC CWA Rivet R
Blue No SR CWA Rivet R
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Bright Yes SC C Screw BHC
Blue Yes SC C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes SC C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Bright Yes SC C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue No SC C Rivet BHC

The following abbreviations are used in the above table:

SC - Straight contoured
SR - Straight rectangular

C - Contoured, screw retained
CWA - Contoured, wrap around, rivet retained
SWA - Straight, wrap around, rivet retained
S - Straight, rivet retained

BHC - Birdshead, contoured
BHF - Birdshead, flat sides
R - Rectangular

As usual, I'm not responsible for any factual errors, but please report any transcription errors to me.


ARISAKA TYPE 97 SNIPER RIFLE

In the early phases of World War 2 when the American’s were first encountering the Japanese in the Pacific, nothing instilled more fear into the American GI than the Japanese sniper. During these early phases of the war, the snipers from Japan were very effective gaining a reputation of exceptional fieldcraft and concealment capability. As tactics developed to counter the sniper threat and as the Japanese losses to their experienced sniper corps mounted, their effectiveness diminished, but their reputation had already been solidified. During the war, one of the rifles the Japanese snipers utilized was a sniper variant of the type 38 rifle called the Type 97.

The Type 97 was based off the Meiji 38th Year (Type 38) infantry rifle and chambered in the 6.5x50mm Arisaka Cartridge. The Type 38 included many design elements from the legendary Mauser action and was a considerable improvement on their own Arisaka 1897 design. Two of the main differences in the Type 38 infantry rifle and the Type 97 Sniper rifle was that the later model used a 2.5x scope, a turned down bolt handle, and the early models came with a bipod.

As was common on sniper rifles during this period, the scope was mounted offset to the left of the receiver to allowed the rifle to be loaded using stripper clips, also known as a charger, and it also allowed the sniper to still be able to utilize the iron sights. The Type 97 was a large rifle with a very long 31.4″ (798mm) barrel and an overall length of 50″ (1.27m) and it weighed in at 8.6 lbs (3.9 kg). The internal 5-round box magazine could be loaded either by a 5-round stripper clip or individually.

The standard sights on the Type 97 rifle was a ladder style adjustable iron sights with a “V” notch granulated to 2200m. The rifle was included a carry case for the scope so when it was not being used it could be removed and protected. The scope for the Type 97 was serialized to match the rifle, and the rifle/scope combo came zeroed from the factory. This was important because the scope did not have any elevation or windage adjustment capabilities so a mismatched scope and rifle were not zeroed. Because there was no windage or elevation adjustments, the reticle was a BDC style calibrated for the 6.5 cartridge. There are vertical stadia lines from 0 to 1500m and horizontal stadia lines to compensate for wind. The center of the crosshairs, where the vertical and horizontal lines meet, is marked as the 300m zero, and the vertical line is slightly canted to compensate for the scope being mounted off to the side. The scope mount was designed to be removed easily and is mounted to the rifle’s receiver using a rail with a rotating locking lever.

Photos courtesy of icollector.com

Due to the long barrel, when fired the rifle produced virtually no smoke or flash which made it very difficult to locate the sniper who was often hidden and tied into the tops of trees or from well camouflaged positions. This was a big contributor to the initial reputation of Japanese snipers in the early parts of the war. The Type 97 was introduced in 1937 but the designation is taken from the Japanese calendar of 2597. Over 20,000 of these sniper rifles were manufactured in the Japanese Kokura and Nagoya arsenals from 1937 to 1945.

The Type 97 was not exceptionally accurate from the beginning and by the end of the war the shortage of raw materials and the desperate situation that Japan found itself in lead to the quality of the rifles suffering even further. The late war production rifles are of poor quality and accuracy. Even then, the Type 97 ended up seeing considerable action in various conflicts beyond World War II including the Second Sino Japanese War, Korean War, Chinese Civil War and the Vietnam War.


Ariksaka Model 1905 Rifle (Meji 38th Year Type) - History

Markings on Japanese Arisaka Rifles and Bayonets of World War II

Adapted from Japanese Rifles of World War II , by Duncan O. McCollum, 1996, published by Excalibur Publications, PO Box 36, Latham, NY 12110-0036, USA, ISBN: 1-880677-11-3 and Military Rifles of Japan , by Fred. L. Honeycutt, Jr., and F. Patt Anthony, Fifth Edition, 1996, published by Julin Books, 5282 Ridan Way, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418, ISBN: 0-9623208-7-0. Bayonet information from Bayonets from Janzen's Notebook , by Jerry L. Janzen, published by Cedar Ridge Publications, 73 Cedar Ridge Road, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74011-1142, USA. ISBN: 0-9619789-1-0.

Table of bayonet variations added 09/07/2000.

Production figures added 08/05/2000.

Spelling of Col. Arisaka's name updated 06/25/2000, based on information supplied by his great-granddaughter.

Markings on Japanese Arisaka Rifles and Bayonets of World War II

The Japanese manufactured over 6.4 million rifles and carbines in the 40 years from 1906 to 1945. Most of these rifles were still in use during the Sino-Japanese War of the 1930s and the Pacific War of the 1940s. During the war and subsequent American occupation of Japan, thousands of these rifles found their way to the United States as war souvenirs, making them one of the most common foreign military firearms available in the country.

The Arisaka rifles are named for Colonel Nariaki Nariakira Arisaka, who headed a commission during the 1890s which was charged with developing a new rifle to replace the earlier models such as the Murata. The Arisaka rifles were designated with the year of the current emperor's reign. Thus, the Type 38 rifle was designed in the 38th year of the reign of Emperor Meiji (1905), and the Type 44 carbine was adopted in the 44th year of his reign (1911). During the reign of Hirohito, rifles were designated by the last one or two digits of the adoption year according to the standard Japanese calendar. Thus, the Type 99 rifle was adopted in Japanese calendar year 2599 (1939), and the Type 2 paratroop rifle was adopted in calendar year 2602 (1942).

A chrysanthemum with 16 petals (the symbol of the Japanese Emperor) was usually stamped on the receiver of rifles manufactured for the Imperial Japanese Army, indicating that the rifle belonged to the Emperor. The chrysanthemum resembles this:

The chrysanthemum was at least partially ground off on rifles which were surrendered after the war, apparently as a face-saving gesture. Rifles captured in the field, however, normally have the chrysanthemum symbol intact. The Type designation was stamped into the top of the receiver using the character shiki for "type" and Japanese numerals. The shiki character and the characters for the Japanese numerals are shown in the following table.

Japanese Characters Used on Arisaka Rifles
Character Meaning
Type
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

A small number of Type 38 and Type 99 rifles had two concentric circles on the receiver in place of the chrysanthemum. The purpose of these specially-marked rifles is not known, although it is speculated that they were issued to paramilitary forces such as the Kempei Tai (Japanese Secret Police), other military police, and guards at prisons, embassies, and other civil instillations. Some concentric circle rifles were remarked standard issue Type 38 and Type 99 rifles that had the chrysanthemum completely or partially removed and replaced with the concentric circle marking. These rifles were serialized separately from regular production pieces. Other rifles apparently were originally manufactured and marked with concentric circles, which looks something like this:

Each Japanese rifle was marked with the symbol of either the arsenal of manufacture or the arsenal that supervised the manufacturing subcontractor. This mark can be found on the left side of the receiver at the end of the rifle serial number. Rifles manufactured by a commercial subcontractor bear the subcontractor's mark to the right of the supervising arsenal's mark. These marks are shown in the following table.

Japanese Rifle Manufacturers
Symbol Arsenal/Subcontractor Period of Operation
Koishikawa Arsenal (Tokyo) 1870-1935
Kokura Arsenal 1935-1945
Nagoya Arsenal 1923-1945
Jinsen Arsenal (Korea) 1923-1945
Mukden Arsenal (Manchuria) 1931-1945
Toyo Kogyo 1939-1945
Tokyo Juki Kogyo 1940-1945
Tokyo Juki Kogyo 1940-1945
Howa Jyuko 1940-1945
Izawa Jyuko 1940-1945

At various times, rifles were removed from military service and sold to other countries or transferred to Japanese schools as training weapons. Normally, the chrysanthemum on these rifles was overstamped with the Koishikawa (Tokyo) / Kokura Arsenal symbol or a ring of small circles to indicate that the rifle no longer belonged to the Imperial Japanese Army. Rifles given to schools often have an additional character stamped on the top of the receiver between the chrysanthemum and the type designation characters. Most of these "school-marked" rifles also have two or three zeros preceeding the serial number. The "school" mark looks something like this:

All Japanese military rifles had serial numbers except extremely rare prototypes, other pre-production guns, and occasional rifles assembled very late in World War II. The serial number was stamped on the left side of the receiver, followed by the arsenal symbol. Initially, rifles make in Japanese arsenals were numbered consecutively within each Type designation. In 1933 this scheme was replaced by a system in which rifles were numbered in blocks, or series, of 99,999 each [actually 100,000, according to Honeycutt, running from serial numbers 0 through 99,999]. Each series was identified by a small Japanese character (kana) placed within a circle to the left of the serial number. Specific blocks of kana were assigned to each arsenal or manufacturer to use for a specific rifle type. The series markings are illustrated in the following table.

Series Markings
Series Number Series Mark Series Number Series Mark
1 24
2 25
3 26
4 27
5 28
6 29
7 30
8 31
9 32
10 33
11 34
12 35
20 37
21 40
22 45
23

The following table, based on information from McCollum's and Honeycutt's books, provides some information about rifle production at the various arsenals, organized by type of rifle. These figures are only estimates, and are based on recorded serial number information. Blank entries indicate that the information in the entry immediately above applies to the blank entry as well.

Production information for sniper rifles, paratroop rifles (Types 100 and 2), Test Type 1 rifles, and Type I rifles (produced by Italy for the Japanese Navy and not based totally on the Arisaka action) are not included.

  1. Koishikawa switched from "B" to "S" barrel proof mark in the late 800,000 serial number range.
  2. Rifles in this series have been observed with (i) mum removed and either an elongated M or the school mark substituted, or (ii) mum overstamped by the Nagoya symbol, an elongated M, or other characters. The elongated M indicates "military reserves".
  3. Some rifles have been reported stamped with the character signifying "for education" (not to be confused with the school mark).
  4. Serial numbers in this range are preceded by two hiragana characters for "i" and "ro", the first two characters in the Japanese syllabary. These characters resemble "w" and "3", and these serial numbers have been misidentified as being in the 300,000 range.
  5. These rifles will normally be found stamped with a symbol similar to the series mark for "4" stamped underneath the receiver or on the barrel, indicating a second class arm.
  6. Carbines with a shallow "00" or "000" stamped in front of the serial number have been removed from service use.
  7. Koishikawa switched from the "B" to the "S" barrel proof mark in the late 20,000 serial number range.
  8. "T" proof mark stamped on barrel at receiver.

The bayonets were normally serial numbered, but the serial numbers were assigned independently from those assigned to the rifles.

Symbols indicating the arsenals at which the bayonets were manufactured, or the arsenal that supervised the subcontractor, are stamped on the right ricasso. These markings are identified in the following table:

Japanese Bayonet Arsenal Marks
Symbol Arsenal/Subcontractor
Tokyo Arsenal prior to 1936
Kokura Arsenal 1936-45
Nagoya Arsenal
Jinsen Arsenal (Korea)
Mukden Arsenal (Manchuria)
National Denki (National Electric)
Unknown
Unknown company under Kokura supervision
National Denki under Kokura supervision
Howa Jyuko under Nagoya supervision
Unknown company under Nagoya supervision
Toyoda Jidoshoki Seisakusho (Toyoda Automatic Loom Works) under Nagoya supervision
Unknown company under Nagoya supervision

The variations are too numerous to illustrate here, but the following table (lifted from Honeycutt) lists the more commonly found variations. The abbreviations are listed below the table. My references do not list any production information for the many variations.

Typical Type 30 Bayonet Variations
Arsenal Mark Blade Finish Fullers Crossguard Shape Grip Shape Grip Fasteners Pommel Shape
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Blue Yes SC C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Blue Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Blue No SC CWA Rivet R
Blue No SC S Rivet R
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Bright Yes SC C Screw BHC
Blue Yes SC C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Blue Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Bright Yes SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue Yes SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue No SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue No SC S Rivet BHF
Bright Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Blue Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Bright Yes SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue Yes SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue No SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue No SC CWA Rivet BHF
Blue No SC S Rivet BHF
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Bright Yes SC C Screw BHC
Blue Yes SC C Screw BHC
Blue Yes SC CWA Rivet R
Blue No SC CWA Rivet R
Blue No SR CWA Rivet R
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Bright Yes SC C Screw BHC
Blue Yes SC C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes SC C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Bright Yes Hook CWA Rivet BHF
Bright Yes SC C Screw BHC
Blue Yes Hook C Screw BHC
Blue No SC C Rivet BHC

The following abbreviations are used in the above table:

SC - Straight contoured
SR - Straight rectangular

C - Contoured, screw retained
CWA - Contoured, wrap around, rivet retained
SWA - Straight, wrap around, rivet retained
S - Straight, rivet retained

BHC - Birdshead, contoured
BHF - Birdshead, flat sides
R - Rectangular

As usual, I'm not responsible for any factual errors, but please report any transcription errors to me.


Type 38 Carbine [ edit | edit source ]

Arisaka Type 38
General Historical Information
Place of origin Japan
Type Carbine
Rate of Fire Around 30 rpm
Magazine 5 rounds
Ammunition 6.5×50mm Arisaka
General Ingame Information
Used by Japan
Used in vehicles War Horse

The Japanese Arisaka Type 38 Carbine (三八式騎銃 Sanpachi-shiki kijū?) was a short barreled version of the bolt-action Type 38 rifle, it was used by the Japanese cavalry, engineers and artillery troops during the First- and Second World War. It entered service in 1905. It was very accurate, and the rifle barrel was 310 mm shorter than the standard rifle. It was also used by rear echelon troops.


Japanese Rifle IdentificationMain Page

Modern Japanese rifles were produced in various configurations and calibers at several Arsenals located thoughout Japan, China, and Korea from about 1897 through 1945. Below are the markings on rifles in 6.5 Japanese Caliber manufactured from 1897 until the mid 1940's. These rifles include: The Type 30 Long Rifle and Carbine, the Type 35 Rifle, the Type 38 Long Rifle, Short Rifle, and Carbine, the Type 44 Carbine, the Type 97 Sniper Rifle, and the Italian Type I Long Rifle.

6.5 Caliber Japanese Rifle Receiver Markings


Type 30 - Model of 1897
Found in Long Rifle and Carbine configurations

Type 35 - Model of 1902
Found in Long Rifle Configuration only
adopted for Naval use

Type 38 - Model of 1905
Found in Long, Short Rifle,
and Carbine Configurations

Type 38 - Model of 1905
Double Circle Rifle or
Concentric Circle Rifle

Type 38 - Model of 1905
'Love of Country' marks
either side of Chrysanthemum

Mexican Type 38 - 1913
Rifle/Carbine configuration
No Type/Arsenal markings

Type 44 - Model of 1915
Found in Carbine Configuration only
3 Variations Identified by Bayonet Housings



Type 97 - Model of 1937
Kokura Arsenal
Sniper Configuration only

Type 97 - Model of 1937
Nagoya Arsenal
Sniper Configuration only

In the late 1930's the Japanese developed a rifle to compete in 'Modern Warfare'. It was a redesign of the Type 38 in a larger caliber, 7.7 Japanese. These rifles include: The Type 99 Long Rifle, the Type 99 Short Rifle, the Type 99 Carbine, the Type 99 Naval Special, the Type 100 Paratroop Rifle, and the Type 2 Paratroop Rifle. Receiver Markings of the 7.7 Caliber guns are below.

7.7 Caliber Japanese Rifle Receiver Markings


Early Type 99 - Model of 1939
Found in Long/Short Rifle
and Carbine configurations

Late Type 99 - Model of 1939
Double Circle Rifle or
Concentric Circle Rifle

Late Type 99 - Model of 1939
Last Ditch Receiver markings
Found on Short Rifles & Carbines

Naval Type 99 - Model of 1939
Naval Receiver markings
Found on Short Rifles & Carbines

Type 2 - Model of 1942
Found in Short Rifle configurations

The Model/Type markings are generally found on the top of the receiver, forward (towards to muzzle) of the chamber and generally indicate original caliber unless modified by another country at a later date. The serial number is found on the left side of the receiver on most standard rifles. The Arsenal mark on Japanese rifles is generally found to the right of the serial number on the left side of the receiver. Frequently there is a Series designator in a circle preceeding the serial number on the left side of the action.


Description and variant types [ edit | edit source ]

The Type 38 rifle used the 6.5×50mm Arisaka cartridge. This cartridge produces little recoil when fired. However, while on par with the Norwegian and Italian 6.5mm military cartridges of the time, the 6.5×50mm was not as powerful as several others in use by other nations. The Type 38 at 1,280 millimeters (50.4 in) was the longest rifle of the war, due to the emphasis on bayonet training for the Japanese soldier of the era, whose average height was 160 centimeters (5 ft 3 in). Ώ] The rifle was even longer when the 400 mm (15.75 inches) Type 30 bayonet was fixed. The Type 38 was fairly heavy, at about 4.25 kg.

Post-war inspection of the Type 38 by the U.S. military and the National Rifle Association found that the Type 38's receiver was the strongest bolt action of any nation ΐ] and capable of handling more powerful cartridges.

Type 38 carbine [ edit | edit source ]

Intended for use by cavalry, engineers, quartermasters and other non-frontline troops, the Type 38 carbine was introduced into service at the same time as the standard Type 38. Its barrel was 487 millimeters (19.2 in), overall length 966 millimeters (38.0 in), and weight 3.3 kilograms (7.3 lb). The rifle lacked a bayonet. It was produced in a number of locations:

  • Koishikawa arsenal from 1906-1935 212,000 units
  • Kokura arsenal from 1933-1940: 80,000 units
  • Nagoya arsenal from 1923-1940: 101,000 units
  • Mukden arsenal from 1934-1940: 7,000 units

Type 44 carbine [ edit | edit source ]

Similar to the Type 38 Carbine, but with a backwards-folding bayonet, introduced in 1911.

Type 97 Sniper Rifle [ edit | edit source ]

As with the standard Type 38, but with a rifle scope with 2.5x magnification, introduced in 1937. Some 14,000 were produced.

Type I Rifle [ edit | edit source ]

The Japanese Imperial Navy purchased a number of rifles from Italy at the beginning of World War II for use by special forces and paratroops. The Italian-built rifles were chambered for the same 6.5×50mm cartridge as the Type 38 rifle, but had a folding stock. The Type I Rifle was similar in appearance and length to the Type 38 rifle, but was based on the Italian Carcano action.


Arisaka Type 38 markings

The Arisaka rifle (有坂銃 Arisaka-jū) is a family of Japanese militarybolt-actionservice rifles, in production and use since approximately 1897, when it replaced the Murata rifle (村田銃 Murata-jū) family, until the end of World War II in 1945.The most common specimens include the Type 38 chambered for the 6.5×50mmSR Type 38 cartridge, and the Type 99 chambered for the 7.7×58mm Type. Arisakatype38serialnumberdates 5 Arisaka. The Type 38. 00. There is no consistency to serial numbers or arsenal marks as the rifles were converted 7 Sep 2000 Thus, the Type 99 rif Below are the markings on rifles in 6.5 Japanese Caliber manufactured from 1897 until the mid 1940's. These rifles include: The Type 30 Long Rifle and Carbine, the Type 35 Rifle, the Type 38 Long Rifle, Short Rifle, and Carbine, the Type 44 Carbine, the Type 97 Sniper Rifle, and the Italian Type I Long Rifle The Type 38 was a manually-operated bolt-action rifle, requiring the operator to actuate a bolt handle found on the receiver. The ensuing action ejected a spent cartridge from the chamber and introduced a fresh cartridge in turn. The standard cartridge for the Type 38 became the 6.5mm / 50mm Arisaka round fired from a basic 5-round box magazine

Below are the characters san-pachi-shiki, i.e. Type 38. This is a reference to Meiji 38 (1905), the year of its adoption. The two holes are a safety feature on all Arisakas: they vent gases upwards in the event of a primer or case head rupture. The serial number and arsenal marking are on the left side of the receiver. The serial number of.

The Type 38 rifle (三八式歩兵銃, sanhachi-shiki hoheijū) was a bolt-action service rifle used by the Empire of Japan predominantly during the Second Sino-Japanese War and Second World War. The design was adopted by the Imperial Japanese Army in 1905 (the 38th year of the Meiji period, hence Type 38).Because the 6.5×50mmSR Arisaka cartridge it fired was considered underpowered, a. This rifle uses the typical Type 38 action & rear sight but the butt plate, front of the stock, bands, bayonet lug & front sight are taken from the Chinese made M1907 Mauser rifle. Of the 5 rifles reported to the authors of The Type 38 Arisaka one had a one piece stock instead of the normal Japanese style 2 piece Welcome from Sitka, Alaska. Neat rifle. It's an Arisaka Type 38 in 6.5x50mmSR caliber. The chrysanthemum crest normally present just ahead of the gas relief holes atop the receiver is missing, and the markings aren't those of a typical Type 38 Two 6.5x50mm carbines were fielded by the IJA. The Type 38 carbine was simply a Type 38 rifle with a shortened 19-inch barrel and a weight of 7.5 pounds. The Type 38 carbine in my collection has an open rear sight with graduations from 400 to 2,000 meters. Some Type 38 carbines were issued with the same peep sight arrangement mentioned above Arisaka type 38 markings over the chrysanthemum identification/help. Original Poster 7 points · 8 months ago. I have been restoring a old type 38 and can't find any info on the marking over the chrysanthemum, any input would be helpfull. level 2. Jrhamm

Arisakatype38serialnumberdate

  • Visible Numbers and Markings . Type 38 rifle From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Type 38 rifle Arisaka was a bolt-action rifle. For a time it was the standard rifle of the Japanese infantry. It was reliable and accurate. It was known also as the Type 38 Year Meiji Carbine in Japan
  • The Arisaka rifle (有坂銃 Arisaka-jū) is a family of Japanese military bolt-action service rifles, in production and use since approximately 1897, when it replaced the Murata rifle (村田銃 Murata-jū) family, until the end of World War II in 1945. The most common specimens include the Type 38 chambered for the 6.5×50mmSR Type 38 cartridge, and the Type 99 chambered for the 7.7×58mm.
  • The Type 38 rifle Arisaka(三八式歩兵銃,san-hachi-shiki hoheijū?) was a bolt-action rifle that was the standard infantry rifle of the Imperial Japanese Army from 1905 (the 38th year of the Meiji period, hence Type 38) to the end of World War II. 1 History and development 2 Description and variant types 2.1 Type 38 carbine 2.2 Type 44 carbine 2.3 Type 97 Sniper Rifle 2.4 Type I Rifle 3.
  • Japanese Military Type 38 Arisaka Bolt Action Rifles: 1923 - 1940 Click Here To See: Close Up Image Of Rifle. The below parts have been removed from a large batch of Type 38 Arisaka rifles that were manufactured at the Kokura, Nagoya and Mukden (Manchuria) Arsenals

Small Arms of WWI Primer 032: Japanese Arisaka Type 38Othais and Mae delve into the story of this WWI classic. Complete with history, function, and live f.. Does anyone know of special markings that the Japenese soldier put on their rifles. I have a Arisaka rifle that my Uncle had from WWII and on the reciever where the chrasomerian is, there are two distinct slash marks accross it which were made with the bayonet (I know b/c the groves match with the bayonet) Hi my YT friends and family! I am introducing you to my WWII Japanese Arisaka Type 38 carbine today! A great shooting carbine for sure! The rounds on the oth.. Arisaka Type 38 Training Rifle Description: Arisaka Type 38 Training Rifle. serial # NVSN, cal. 6.5 Jap. Blank, has a 31 1/2 barrel with smooth bore, this is a blank training rifle made from type 38 rifle. All markings removed except for the Nippon Special Steel Crest stamped on the receiver. The finish is mostly patina Maxim Popenker: Arisaka 38 and 99. In: Modern Firearms. world.guns.ru, abgerufen am 27. Mai 2016 (englisch). www.nazarian.no: Arisaka Year 38 / 38 Carbine (englisch) Markings on Japanese Arisaka Rifles and Bayonets of World War II (englisch

Arisaka Type 38 Serial Number Lookup - entrancementi

  1. antly during the Second Sino-Japanese War and Second World War.[2] The design was adopted by the Imperial Japanese Army in 1905 . Because the 6.5×50mmSR Arisaka cartridge it fired was considered underpowered, a replacement was devised, the Type 99 rifle, but both rifles saw usage until the end of the war
  2. Type 38 Barrel seat.Will also work on 38 Carbines,44 Carbines,Chinese 65 Infantry Rifles( 38 Copy) Type 30,Type 30 Carbine and Type I Rifles. 0.00: $10.00 Type 38 Rifle Part
  3. e there is this 03 on the top rear part of the action.
  4. Japanese Arisaka Type 38 bolt action rifle.Japanese Arisaka Type 38 bolt action rifle. Cal. 6.5mm. 31 bbl. SN 910641. Blued finish with plain wood stock and leather sling. Mum is intact. Lot consists of two (2) WWII period JapaneseLot consists of two (2) WWII period Japanese Arisaka-type bayonets. Both complete with scabbards and in excellent.
  5. ww2 or wwii japanese arisakatype38 military 6.5mm rifle. 31 barrel. Kokura arsenal 24th(late 1930's) series crisply struck about serial number. Matching bolt and dustcover
  6. Get the best deals on Arisaka Bayonet when you shop the largest online selection at eBay.com. Free shipping on many items Japanese Arisaka Type 30 Last Ditch Bayonet with Wooden Scabbard . $249.99. $12.99 shipping. WWII Japanese Arisaka Rifle Bayonet w/Scabbard-Arsenal Markings . $225.00. 0 bids. $19.00 shipping. Ending Saturday at 12.
  7. Re: Japanese Type 38 Arisaka by Alan M The S is the Koishikawa ( Tokyo ) Arsenal barrel proof stamp ( this mark was switched from a B at around the 800,000 s/n ) .As far as the age of the rifle is concerned , Koishikawa made the first 2 million type 38's from 1906 to 1935 so if yearly production numbers were fairly consistent yours ( s.

Chief among these idiocies was the firing of service ammunition in training rifles that outwardly appeared to be Type 38 or Type 99 rifles, but were actually crudely made training rifles with unrifled barrels. Factory markings of the Toyo Kogyo: I recently purchased a type 99 arisaka which from what I can tell is a Toyo Kogyo mid war. The Arisaka Type 38 6.5mm (1905) was known to the Japanese soldier as the sanpachiju and was a five-shot weapon that used an internal box magazine loaded with 6.5mm cartridges via brass or steel stripper clips. It had a bolt-action system patented by Mauser. It was a reliable weapon with a weight of nine pounds (empty), relatively light for its. Arisaka Type 38. Designed in 1905 and immediately put into service, the Type 38 was in use by the Japanese forces until 1945. The Japanese built approximately 3.4 million of them during that time, with the common variants being a carbine and cavalry carbine. The build was of wood and metal, like the others in the series RN Arisaka Type 38 Carbine? ikuturso. 18. O/R. ikuturso. 18. Post Sep 27, 2017 #1 2017-09-27T20:18. Gentlemen, I think this is the corner of the internet where I might be able to find an explanation for these markings. The Type 38 carbine was found in Finland, and is in a rather nice condition, even retaining the original dust cover.. One such captured weapon was the Type 38 Arisaka rifle. The Japanese lost a significant number of them in China, and they were not overlooked by their captors. Once China had adopted the SKS and then AK as front-line weapons, a large number of captured Type 38s were converted to use the standard 7.62x39mm cartridge

Arisaka Type 38 Bolt-Action Infantry Service Rifl

Arisaka Type 38. This is a discussion on Arisaka Type 38 within the Rifles forums, part of the Sniping Related category I have one of these complete with dust cover and bayonet which is pretty rare. Mine also has all the Emperors markings intact which is. Vaughn, you just described a Type 99 not a Type 38. The 99's were the only guns with AA sights, chromed bore and monopods -- the Type 97 sniper excepted but still no chrome or AA sights. Now, a 0 series Type 99 was most likely manufactured during late 1939 or early 1940, assuming (yeah, I know) that 99 production began in the last quarter of '39 Markings on Japanese Arisaka Rifles and Bayonets of World War II (updated 09/07/2000) Markings on British and Commonwealth Bayonets (updated 11/15/2003) Manufacture Dates of Swiss Schmidt-Rubin Rifles (updated 01/27/2001) Unit markings on Weimar police equipment (added 10/18/2000 Visible Numbers and Markings. Type 38 rifle From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Type 38 rifle Arisaka was a bolt-action rifle. For a time it was the standard rifle of the Japanese infantry. It was reliable and accurate. It was known also as the Type 38 Year Meiji Carbine in Japan

Castle-Thunder.com: Japanese Arisaka Rifle Identificatio

A Japanese Arisaka Type 38 in the condition you describe, but with the Mum intact, 31 Barrel, Non matching numbers, 6.5X51R Caliber in Good to Better Condition is worth $300-$375.00 and up in value. Storia. Il fucile Arisaka fu progettato dal colonnello Arisaka Nariakira (1852-1915) per rimpiazzare l'obsolescente Type 22 Murata.Dallo scorcio del XIX secolo alla metà del XX secolo furono prodotti diversi lotti e varianti, incluse quelle di transizioni dalla cartuccia 6,5 mm Type 38 alla più potente 7,7 mm Type 99 e quelle per paracadutisti (disassemblabili in due parti) There are T-38 and T-99 type training rifles . They were made to train people to operate real T-38 or T-99 rifles , so were made to look the same but do not have real rifle parts . No training rifles were ever made to fire live ammo . Most School rifles can fire live ammo . They were once real rifles pulled from service Parts are bin pulled unless noted, various markings and finishes noted. Bayonet Stud Original Japanese Arisaka Type 38 part.

Receiver ring markings. Cancelled chrysanthemum Imperial ownership stam, dual gas venting holes (similar to 1903 Springfield Hatcher Hole) and Type 38 in Japanese. 38 Another view of receiver ring markings. 39 Rear of bolt cover or action cover. 40 Safety shroud. 41 Rear receiver bridge - sliding bolt cover removed. 42 Receiver top view, bolt. The Arisaka Type 38 rifle (三八式歩兵銃, san-bachi-shiki hoheijū), or also know as the Type 38 Year Meiji Carbine, was a rifle used by Japan during the Russo-Japanese War, the Russian Civil War, the First World War, the Second Sino-Japanese War and the Second World War.It is the oldest Japanese rifle used in Forgotten Hope Secret Weapon! It enters in service during the 38th year of the. Here’s an interesting story about the Arisaka Type 38. Now this is from memory…but: as you’ve probably noticed, the Arisaka 38 (“38†I couldn't tell from your pictures if you still have the markings but its easy to tell if they were removed because it was done fast and ugly with a grinder. The Arisaka 38.

Get the best deals for type 38 arisaka at eBay.com. We have a great online selection at the lowest prices with Fast & Free shipping on many items .7×58mm Arisaka cartridge as it was found that the old 6.5mm Arisaka cartridge was no longer adequate. Approximately 2,500,000 were produced in a number of variants, including carbines and sniper rifles

Arisaka Type 38 Schematic W/ Parts List. Product #: PDF0010A Part Key: 0. $1.50. Out of Stock. Add to My Saved Parts. Eligible for FREE shipping * 1 Extractor Enlarge Image. Extractor, 6.5 Cal. Product #: 316480 Part Key: 1. $30.75. WW2 Japanese Arisaka Type 38 Carbine Rifle Leather Sling with Unit Markings. Unit marked with white Kanji characters 1st Raiding Brigade which was a Japanese Paratrooper unit. Brass Hardware to ensure a long life. A great quality item for the historical reenactor or for a war trophy. Exceptional quality reproductio Type 38 Arisaka Hello folks. My first new acquisition in a while, and a pickup from the Military Odyssey show. I must admit, I am new to Japanese rifles, and to Japanese militaria in general. I love how the markings on your type 38 have not been graded off!! Having seen a few last ditch rifles, I can understand why you wouldn't want to. The Arisaka Type 38 carbine is a short version of the Type 38 rifle and was designed in 1905 as a result of the experience gained in the Russo-Japanese War. It has many features of the German Mauser G98 action and was one of the standard weapons used by the Japanese Military forces during the Second World War

. C $35.79 3 bids + C $7.78 shipping I have done the swap overs with no issues with the type 38s. I have also swapped safety knobs on type 99s with different type 99 bolts. All you need to make sure is that you get a type 38 safety knob. when you start changing bolts, although not usually a problem, you have to start thinking about head space change

Type 38 Carbine - Nambu Worl

Type 38 +Bayonet Type 38 +Type 2 Rifle Grenade Discharger Type 97 Sniper Rifle Ammo: 6.5×50mmSR Arisaka *5 Features: ・Low power, but high initial velocity and low recoil. ・Quick reload of veteran soldiers. ・Craftmanship of detail the safety switch. ・Japanese spirit Feedback is always welcome! < > Interestingly these rifles can be found with one or more of the following countries markings: Japan, Britain, Russia, Mexico, Germany, Austria, Hungary and Finland (who obtained some of these guns after WW1). Arisaka Type 38 Rifle Assembly Drawing and Parts List Arisaka Type 38 Carbine Assembly Drawing and Parts List. Type 30 Sword Bayonet The Type 30 was designed by Col Arisaka, the Type 38, as well as the subsequent 7.7mm Arisakas, were redesigns by MAJ Nambu based on the T30 platform (the biggest changes were the bolt, dust cover, and caliber for the 7.7mm) Japanese Arisaka Type 38 Carbine Leather Sling with Unit Markings $ 26.99. Quick View. Compare. SALE. Out of stock . Japanese Arisaka Type 38 Carbine Sling, Cleaning Rod and Muzzle Cover $ 49.99. Rated 5 out of 5. Quick View. Compare. NOTIFY ME! Notify me! Join the waitlist to be emailed when this product becomes available

Type 38 rifle - Wikipedi

The Type 38 Rifle, and its various modified versions, continued to be used by the Japanese military until the end of World War II. Throughout the Russo-Japanese War, Arisaka continued to work on improvements and variations to his rifles, and at the request of Chief of the General Staff Yamagata Aritomo , he also worked on designs for large. The most predominant user was the Russian Empire, who ordered up to 600,000 Arisaka rifles, with at least half or more of those being Type 30 rifles and carbines. [5] Early in World War I Britain ordered c.150,000 Type 30, and Type 38 rifles and carbines from Japan as a stopgap until the manufacture of their own Lee-Enfield rifle caught up. Type 99 Arisaka battle rifles utilize a unique, disc-shaped safety, and their stocks were finished with the resin of the urushi tree. Joseph's rifle is chambered for the 7.7x58mm Japanese round. Strong, durable, and powerful, this bolt-action battle rifle had a short but honorable service life

Type 38 / Type 30 End Cap: Type 38 Bolt Stop/Ejector Spring: Type 38 Butt Plate Screw/Sling Swivel Screw (Short) Type 38 Carbine Bayonet Band: $20.00. $8.00. $7.00. $55.00. Type 38 Carbine Rear Band Spring: Type 38 Ejector: Type 38 End Cap & Pin: Type 38 Extractor: $45.00. $8.00. $22.00. $18.00 Japanese Arisaka Type 38 rifle showing 16-petal chrysanthemum and characters that spell Type 38. The series of six numbers on the left side of the receiver is the serial number of the Japanese Arisaka Type 38, which is 749348. The circle symbol of the manufacturer is to the right of the numbers

My guess is that it's based on the extremely rare and pricey KTW Type 38 springer, except this one has a detachable magazine whereas the KTW has an internal reservoir. Externally the S&T looks pretty good and the dimensions seems pretty much spot on, although the finish looks alot better on the KTW (would be strange otherwise, as the KTW is 5. WWII JAPANESE BAYONET SCABBARD TYPE 38 99 ARISAKA RIFLE KOKURA ARSENAL SIGNED You are bidding on a WWII Japanese bayonet and scabbard. The bayonet will fit the Japanese Type 38 and 99 rifles. The bayonet was made at the Kokura Arsenal. It is about 20 inches in length and the blade is about 15 5/8 inches. The grips are wood and show some wear Japanese Arisaka Type 99 Bolt Assembly Rating Required Select Rating 1 star (worst) 2 stars 3 stars (average) 4 stars 5 stars (best) Nam Character in Chinese read From top to bottom 6/5 infantry and a character that in Japanese means Spruce as in the tree. No other markings. Barrel is original without any sign of refinish and receiver and tik alignment marks are original. Stock is single piece not the normal two piece Japanese. All other aspects are identical to Japanese Type 38

$150 Arisaka Type 38 Carbine. it's a Type 38 carbine, and it was made at the Nagoya Arsenal. at some point. The series marking is kinda worn away, so I'm not sure of the year. Tennōheika Banzai! Judging from the markings, I'd say its a 5th series Nagoya. Edit: ca.1933-ca.1940 Japanese Arisaka Type 99 Accessory Kit, Repro. $69.95. World War Supply WW2 Japanese Arisaka Type 38 Carbine Leather Sling with Unit Markings. 4.8 out of 5 stars 3. $29.99 $ 29. 99. FREE Shipping. Accmor 2 Point Slings Two Point and Traditional Slings for Outdoor Sports. World War Supply WW2 Japanese ARISAKA Type 38 Leather Sling Unit Marked. 4.7 out of 5 stars 12. $29.99 $ 29. 99 Arisaka Type 99 Serial Number Dates >> tlniurl.com/1lufs The Carcano Arisaka can be unloaded as the model 1905 (38): just depress the latch located into the front part of the trigger guard, this releases the floorplate of the magazine box. The rear sight (an adjustable leaf, plus a fixed battle sight, both with a wide V-notch), is the same of the Arisaka 38

My most recent rifle is this Arisaka Type 30. This is the true Arisaka because it was designed by Colonel Arisaka Nariakira. The Type 38 and Type 99 were actually developed by Major Kijiro Nambu. Anyway, this is a lesser known Japanese firearm unless you are into this category. It is the successor of the old Murata In 1941, shortly after the adoption of the new 7.7mm rifle cartridge, it was decided that a sniper rifle variant of the Type 99 should be made in addition to the Type 97 (which was basically a scoped Type 38) Thanks in advance for your help. Welcome to the Forum, Duke. The intact mum means that your Type 38 is a battlefield pickup/vet bring-back. That means it commands a premium. Most of the Arisaka rifles you see have the mum defaced in some way. The Mum marked the rifle as the Emperor's property, not to be surrendered

Arisaka Type 38 Serial Number Lookup 10/7/2019 Firearm Technical Trivia, September 2000 CRUFFLER.COM presents Firearms Technical Trivia, September 2000: Arisaka Rifle Collector's Guide by In the late 19th Century, Imperial Japan joined other industrial nations in equipping its military forces a repeating bolt-action rifle that fired smokeless. As the good folks here have said- STOP. I just went and dug out the type 38 I have at the very back of the safe, waiting for restoration. The type 38 has 2 locking lugs at the very front of the bolt, that cam into the lug recesses at the back of the chamber. Yours has no lugs, no recesses Price $300.00 Brand Seller Available on Cal Guns Location Tokyo Description Arisaka Type 38 6.5x257Roberts Rosamond,Ca $300.00 Will ship (Y): Low Serial Number (believe 1905) Arisaka Type 38, Koishikawa Arsenal (Tokyo) 5 digit serial with no series, Mum is marked as the rifles were when removed from service, All numbers match except bolt, Bolt is in the white, Stock has been refinished but. I have a WWII bring back Type 38 very close to yours(7105*). A late Uncle of mine captured several with full Chrysanthemums. I haven`t had it long in my possession because a cousin inherited first.I have looked for a date stamped but don`t see one. So IDK as of now The two-piece Arisaka stock, straight bolt handle and the unwieldy Type 38 barrel were retained, giving it the outward appearance of a Japanese service rifle. Students of both Italian and Japanese World War II battle rifles have found much to admire in the Type I, which stands for Italian, by the way, and is not a numeric designation

Arisaka1 - Carbines for Collector

  1. Nagoya Arsenal 1923-1945. Model/Type 38 Long Rifles. Model/Type 38 Carbines. Model/Type 38 Short Rifles. Model/Type 44 Cavalry Carbines. Model/Type 99 Long Rifle
  2. Arisaka Model 99 Carbines. The Proper Translation is Model Not Type. Italian-Japanese MP 38/43 Machine Pistol (October, 2003) Japanese Pistols. Japanese Handgun Websites. Model 14 Pictures. Model 94 Pictures. Nambu Model 94 and Model 14 Yearly Production Rarity Charts. Nambu Model 94 and Model 14 Serial Number Range
  3. Arisaka Serial Number Lookup Japanese Rifle Arisaka Serial Number Arisaka Serial Numbers by Year. WTS Arisaka Type 38 Low Serial Number Rosa. 800 x 300 jpeg 42kB. Jul 29, 2011 - Type 38 Japanese Rifle Arisaka 6.5mm. There are serial numbers > 1923560 with three rings after it in a triangle (12 O'clock, 5 O'clock and 7
  4. Buy Arisaka Type 38 Trainer 6.5 NICE CREST & MARKINGS! WW2 WWII: GunBroker is the largest seller of Bolt Action Rifles Rifles Guns & Firearms All: 88458214
  5. WW2 Japanese ArisakaType38 Carbine Rifle Leather Sling with Unit Markings. After many years of searching for a quality original Arisakatype38 Carbine sling I finally found one and sent it to my leather guy and had him make an exact copy. Unit marked with white Kanji characters 1st Raiding Brigade which was a Japanese Paratrooper unit

Model: Arisaka Type 38. Serial Number: 00614086. Year of Manufacture: 1905-1945. Caliber: 6.5x50mm Jap. Action Type: Bolt Action, Internal Magazine. Markings: There is no visible import mark. The top of the receiver has had its markings defaced Arisaka Type 38 Training Rifle. Serial # NVSN, cal. Blank, has a 31 1/2' barrel with smooth bore, this is a blank training rifle made from type 38 rifle. All markings removed except for.Click for more info Arisaka type 38 6.5 jap. Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Bubba0182, Oct 25, I have one Type 38 carbine with that particular marking and it also has a fixed aperture type rear sight. I have never seen or heard of a T-38 with the model markings (the '38 Type' characters) removed (by either the Japanese or Occupation forces),. The Type 38 Arisaka's trigger is military two-stage. After taking up the initial slack, mine cleanly breaks at a respectable five pounds without creep or overtravel. Apparently, there's not much to be safely done to lighten the Type 38's trigger pull to competition-legal 3.5 pounds while still retaining original parts and full reliability.

Arisaka Identification Help The Firearms Foru

  1. Arisaka Type 38 Carbine in 6.5mm. World War Two Japanese Type 38 Carbine in 6.5mm. Standard features apply to this Arisaka Type 38 carbine. It is 38″ long overall. The barrel is 19″ long. It has the standard Mauser type action with round-headed straight handled bolt and 5 shot internal magazine. The action and barrel appear to be re-blued
  2. After a short period of testing using modified Type 38 rifles and ironing out of teething issues, the Type 99 was born. The Type 99 appeared in 1939 and was similar to the Meiji 38th series with the major exception of it being chambered to fire the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge
  3. Japanese Arisaka Type 38 rifle, 6.5 mm with forged-steel bayonet partially eradicated chrysanthemum stamp on receiver. General History The Japanese Arisaka Type 38 rifles were all turn bolt-operated, with five-round non-detachable staggered row box magazines. They were loaded with five-round stripper clips, a flat metal piece holding a five.

The Type 99 Arisaka rifle is one of the few military bolt actions from the early twentieth-century that features a hinged floorplate. Type 99s were made from 1939 to 1945, and according to the armory markings and serial number on the rifle, it turned out to have been made sometime in 1939-40 in Nagoya, a major city about 250 miles west of Tokyo Arisaka type 38 serial # 13660 44 long 24.5 barrel 20 Bayonet type 30 Type 38 - 6.5 x 50mm Kokura Arsenal Made 1933-1940 Normal 38's are 50 or the carbide are 38 Type 38 Cavalry rifl You are bidding on a really nice, authentic WWII Arisaka Type 38 rifle sling that came on a battlefield picked vet bring back rifle with intact Mum! This one has Japanese characters on it and looks to have had an earlier set of markings that were painted over. Leather is still supple, and not dried out or brittle Firing Pin Spring & Sear Spring Japanese Arisaka Type 38 and 99. Japanese Arisake Type 38 Rifle and Type 99 Rifle. $8.99: JAP38-1&2: Floorplate Hinge Pin, Japanese Arisaka Rifle. $4.00: MISC-1815 or MN-29P: Follower with Spring Japanese Arisaka Rifle. As Pictured. $25.0

Also known as 6.5 Arisaka, 6.5 Japanese, 6.5 X 50 Arisaka- fits Type 30, 35, 38, and 44 rifles. 140 grain Soft Point Speer New brass Non-corrosive, premium powder and primers 2,430 FPS from 31″ barrel Type 99 Arisaka. Though seen in great numbers, the Type 99 sometimes referred to as the Type 99 Arisaka, was by no means a particularly revolutionary rifle. It was something of a simplified, cost-effective continuation of the popular Type 38 first issued to Imperial forces in 1905 Type 38 Arisaka short rifle in caliber. wait for it. 7.62x39. The bore was bored out and according to some sources an chamber insert used for this conversion, Stock is shortened, mag follower notched for a sheet metal guide in the mag well that keeps the rounds to the rear Model: Arisaka Type 38 Carbine Serial Number: 62559 Year of Manufacture: 1905 -1945 Caliber: 6.5x50mm (6.5 Jap) Action Type: Bolt Action, Internal Magazine Markings: There is no visible import mark. The top of the receiver is marked with the Imperial ownership mark a chrysanthemum and with the Japanese symbols for Type 38 The Italian-built rifles were chambered for the same 6.50 x 50 mm cartridge as the Type 38 rifle. Arisaka Serial Number Lookup Japanese Rifle Arisaka Serial Number Arisaka Serial Numbers by Year Arisaka Type 38 Identify Arisaka Type 38 Caliber Arisaka Type 99 Rifle Markings Arisaka Type 38 Ammunition Japanese Arisaka Type 99 Rifle Arisaka

The Type 99 'Arisaka' Rifle was a bolt-action rifle utilized by Imperial Japan during World War II.. Description. It had a 5 round magazine and a weight of about 3.7 kg. The Type 99 was chambered for the 7.7x58mm Arisaka Cartridge and had a length of about 1.1 meters. The Type 99 eventually became the standard bolt-action rifle of the Imperial Japanese Army New Made Item: This is an exact copy of an original Japanese WW2 T-38 leather sling. It will also fit the Type 30 & Type 35 Japanese rifles. Every sling comes complete with black steel buckle and button, replicated WW2 Japanese markings and correct thick yet supple oiled tan finished leather. Many poor replica Type 38 slings are on the market today this is not one of them. Simply put.

Arisaka Rifles & Carbines RifleMagazin

  1. Japanese Arisaka 38 Bolt Action Rifle, Training Rifle, Heiwa Shiki Type (Peace Type), GSS, G-VG, C&R, Used. Japanese Arisaka 38 bolt action training rifle with no mum or manufacture identification marks and a receiver ring marked with three..
  2. The Type 38 Arisaka is a study of the Japanese rifles and carbines based upon the type 38 Arisaka action, their variations and history. This in depth study has been under way for more than twenty years
  3. The Type 38 Arisaka is a bolt-action rifle that was used by the Imperial Japanese during the first half of the 20th century. This rifle only has the proof markings from the factory. UPC.
  4. | Japanese Arisaka Type 99 Stock& Handguard Set w/ Metal- Used This is an original stock& handguard set for the Arisaka Type 99. 7.7mm caliber rifle. It includes a stock and an early pattern handguard with a 16-3/8 OAL. The stock includes the trigger guard& floorplate assembly, magazine box, steel buttplate, recoil lug, and cleaning rod& retainer
  5. ARISAKA TYPE 38 CARBINE. For Sale from John S. Burda | Positive feedback: 98% View | Verified Seller | 2890 Completed Sales View Sellers Items Description: Japanese Arisak carbine with a full mum,and an overstamp of the Tokyo arsenal and a 19 barrel with a shootable bore, strong rifling , pits down in the grooves on this 6.5mm carbine.Stock.

Arisaka type 38 markings over the chrysanthemum

Designed in the early 1900's the Arisaka Type 38 rifle was one of the most common bolt action rifles seen in the hands of the Japanese Imperial Army. While not as powerful as its successor, the Type 99, the Type 38 was well designed and enjoyed widespread use and respect from the soldiers who fielded it in combat The Type 35 Arisaka (三十五年式歩兵銃 Sanjūgo-nen-shiki hoheijū, lit. 35th year infantry rifle) was a Japanese bolt-action rifle designed by Captain Kijirō Nambu in 1902 and produced by the Tokyo Arsenal from 1902 to 1905. The second iteration of the Arisaka rifle, the Type 35 acted as an improvement over the original Type 30 Arisaka and was adopted in small numbers. 1 History 2. The Imperial Japanese Army Type 30 bayonet was produced from 1897 until 1945 to accompany the Arisaka Type 38 rifle. The designation as Type 30 was a result of the bayonets official adoption in the 30th year of the Emperors reign. Until the late 1930's, the Type 30 bayonet remained virtually unchanged, but as wartime production increased.

Arisaka Type 38 Rifle - thepaulkfamily

The standard infantry rifle of Imperial Japan from 1899 to around 1905, when the Type 38 was introduced. This rifle features the standard inverted V blade type front sight and a V notch rear on a folding ladder graduated to 1,900 yards with a 2,000 yard top notch. The receiver is correctly unserialized and features the imperial mum and Type 30 markings on top of the front ring, a manually. Arisaka Type 38. Jump to Latest Follow 1 - 16 of 16 Posts. RAT76 Mum & the Type 38 markings. The numbers on the bolt don't match any of the serial number. Best I can figure from the serial number & armory markings is that this one was made around 1920 or so. S/N 804534 out of 2.2 million made at the Tokyo armory between 1905. The Type 30 bayonet (三十年式銃剣, sanjūnen-shiki jūken) was a bayonet designed for the Imperial Japanese Army to be used with the Arisaka Type 30 Rifle and was later used on the Type 38 and Type 99 rifles.Some 8.4 million were produced, and it remained in front-line use from the Russo-Japanese War to the end of World War II.All.

Arisaka Type 38,99, 44 Rifles. 602 likes. Interes Arisaka. A series of bolt-action rifles manufactured in Japan. Shop available Arisaka parts from Numrich Gun Parts Corporation today! We've been supplying customers with hard to find parts since 1950 The Japanese Arisaka rifle type 38 of the 1905 sample is a shop rifle with a longitudinally rotary bolt of the times of the First and Second World Wars. Condition is very good to fine with crisp mum and chamber markings, retaining approx. 94% lightly thinning blue. Stock with scuffs, scratches and minor impressions. Action and bore are good. Found an Arisaka type 99. This is a discussion on Found an Arisaka type 99 within the Foreign forums, part of the Gun Forum category 7.62, Using a clean cotton cloth, you can probably apply the Sno-Seal without removing the sling. If it were mine, I'd get some moisture back.

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