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Soley DD- 707 - History

Soley DD- 707 - History



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Soley
(DD-707: dp. 2,200, 1. 376'6 b. 40'10"; dr. 15'8, s. 34.2 k.; cpl. 345, a. 6 5", 12 40mm., 11 20mm., 6dcp., 2 dct., 10 21 tt.; cl. Allen M. Sumner)

Soley (DD-707) was laid down on 18 April 1944 at Kearny, N.J., by Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Co.; launched on 8 September 1944, sponsored by Mrs. C. M. Cornfelt, Mrs. Howard C. Dickinson, and Mrs. Dickinson, Jr.; and commissioned on 7 December 1944, Comdr. John S. Lewis in command.

Soley sailed on 29 December 1944 for a shakedown cruise in Bermuda waters. On 1 February 1945, she headed back toward the Brooklyn Navy Yard for post shakedown availability before joining the Atlantic fleet at Norfolk, Va., on 18 February. After serving in the Virginia Capes area as a training ship, she was ordered to the west coast.

Soley arrived at San Diego on 17 August. She reached Pearl Harbor 10 days later and was routed onward to the Marshall Islands, arriving at Kwajalein on 5 September. Soley joined Task Unit (TU) 96.15.1, a Military Government Unit, which sortied for Kusaie Island, on 7 September, to take part in the acceptance of the surrender of Japanese forces. The surrender articles were signed on the 8th, and Soley remained at Kusaie as station ship until mid-October.

From 14 October to 17 December, the destroyer operated directly under the Commander of the Marshall-Gilbert Islands Area. On two occasions, she was called upon to transport Japanese prisoners from outlying islands to Kwajalein for possible trial before the War Crimes Commission. The most prominent among them was Rear Admiral Sakaibara, the commander at Wake Island.

On 18 December, Soley departed the Marshall Islands for Japan and duty with the occupation forces arriving at Yokosuka on 27 December 1945. In February 1946' the destroyer was ordered to return to Casco Bay, Maine, via Hawaii, Long Beach, and the Panama Canal. In December 1946, the ship sailed to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for training exercises and next reported to Charleston, S.C., for inactivation with the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. The destroyer was placed in reserve, out of commission, on 15 April 1947.

Soley was placed in commission again on 29 January 1949. After pre-shakedown training, the ship entered the Charleston (S.C.) Naval Shipyard for an overhaul from March through May. Following shakedown in Guantanamo Bay, Soley joined Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 20, with its home port at Norfolk. She operated with her squadron along the east coast until 4 August 1950 when she sailed to the Mediterranean Sea for duty with the 6th Fleet. The destroyer represented the United States at the funeral of King Gustaf V of Sweden. She was in Stockholm on 9 November, with Rear Admiral Walter F. Boone, the Commander in Chief, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Naval Forces, on board. She rejoined the 6th Fleet in December and, in January 1951, returned to Norfolk for an overhaul.

Yard work was completed on 15 May, and the ship proceeded to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training. Soley resumed her routine east coast operations which she continued until May 1952. On 15 May, she got underway, with three other destroyers, for Japan, via the Panama Canal and Pearl Harbor, arriving at Yokosuka on 18 June.

Soley steamed north to the Korean war zone and, from 22 June to 1 July, operated in the antisubmarine screen of Task Force (TF) 77, the fast carrier task force. During this period, the carriers conducted raids against the North Korean hydro electric power stations on the Yalu River. Soley and Helena (CA-74) were detached from the task force to go to the "bomber line" to provide shore bombardment in support of ground troops.

Sole1y and Helena joined Iowa (BB-61), and the trio conducted shore bombardment at Wonsan, Kojo, and Kosong through 9 July. From 21 July to 22 August the destroyer operated with the United Nations Blockade and Escort Force (TF 95) in the Wonsan-Hungnam area and north to Chaho. She bombarded railroad and highway bridges and tunnels. She took on board more than 60 prisoners and refugees from sampans in the bombardment area. During the first half of September, the destroyer operated with an antisubmarine hunter-killer group. She returned to TF 77 on 15 September and operated with it until proceeding to Sasebo on 9 October.

Soley then departed the Far East on 19 October for Norfolk, but not on a direct route. She returned via Malaya, Ceylon, and Arabia, proceeded through the Red Sea and the Suez Canal, and made stops at ports in Italy and France, and Gibraltar; and finally arrived at Norfolk on 12 December 1952. On 25 January 1953, Soley sailed for operations in the Caribbean. Upon her return to Norfolk, she commenced an overhaul and was there from 30 April to 21 August. Refresher training was held from 3 September to 2 November followed by preparations for her second world cruise.

On 4 January 1954, Soley, Strong (DD-758), and Barton (DD-722) stood out of Norfolk en route to the west coast. They transited the Panama Canal on 9 January and anchored briefly at San Diego where Stickell (DDR-888) joined the group before continuing west. The destroyers called at Pearl Harbor and Midway before arriving at Yokosuka on 7 February. She completed a patrol off Kodea made port calls from Hong Kong to South Africa and returned to Norfolk on 10 August 1954.

Soley operated along the east coast until being deployed to the Mediterranean from July 1956 to February 1957 and again from July to December 1957. She was participating in "Springboard 58," the annual Caribbean exercise, during January 1958 when she and Barton (DD-722) rescued the crew of SS St. Eleftiero which later sank. In subsequent years, Soley was deployed to the Mediterranean from October 1958 to April 1959; from September 1961 to March 1962; and from 29 March to 4 September 1963. In 1962, during the Cuban crisis, she served with the quarantine forces off Cuba from October to December.

On 1 March 1964, Soley's home port was changed to Charleston, S.C.; and, on 1 April, she was assigned duty as a Naval Reserve Training ship. She served in this capacity until being decommissioned on 13 February 1970. Soley was struck from the Navy list on 1 July 1970 and sunk as a target.

Soley received one battle star for service in Korea.


Soley DD- 707 - History

USS Soley , a 2200-ton Allen M. Sumner class destroyer, was built at Kearny, New Jersey. Commissioned in December 1944, she operated in the Atlantic before transferring to the Pacific fleet in August 1945. For the rest of that year and into early 1946, Soley supported post-war occupation activities in the Central Pacific and Japan. She then returned to the Atlantic for another year before entering the Reserve Fleet in April 1947.

In late January 1949, Soley recommissioned to begin more than two decades of continuous active service, mainly in the Atlantic. She went to the Mediterranean Sea for the first of many Sixth Fleet deployments in August 1950. In May-December 1952, the destroyer temporarily left the Atlantic, via the Panama Canal, to take part in Korean War combat operations, during which she used her guns to bombard enemy targets ashore. Soley returned to the U.S. east coast via the Indian Ocean and Suez Canal, thus completing a cruise around the World.

In January-August 1954 Soley again circumnavigated the Earth westbound for a second tour of Far Eastern duty. Thereafter operating in the Mediterranean and western Atlantic areas, her activities included many military exercises, plus rescuing the crew of the sinking merchant ship St. Eleftiero in January 1958 and participation in the Cuban quarantine in October-December 1962. Soley became a Naval Reserve Training Ship, based at Charleston, South Carolina, in April 1964. Following nearly six years of that duty, she was decommissioned in 1970. The former USS Soley was sunk as a target in September 1970.

USS Soley was named in honor of James Russell Soley, who served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy in 1890-93.

This page features all our views of USS Soley .

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Underway on 22 December 1944. Photographed from a Naval Air Station, New York, aircraft, flying at an altitude of 300 feet.
The ship is wearing camouflage Measure 32 Design 11a.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 116KB 740 x 600 pixels

Underway on 22 December 1944. Photographed from a Naval Air Station, New York, aircraft, flying at an altitude of 600 feet.
Note ship's shadow on the water off her port side.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 89KB 740 x 610 pixels

Being reactivated at the Charleston Naval Shipyard, South Carolina, after she had been out of commission for nearly two years. Photo is dated 29 January 1949, the day Soley was recommissioned.
The original caption states: "View with huts removed and placed on dock in foreground. Large huts cover 40mm mounts, small huts cover MK 51 directors and searchlights. Three 'Zippered' DD's in the background are part of 129 ships in the Charleston group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet."

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 128KB 740 x 610 pixels

Photographed circa the early or middle 1950s, after she had been refitted with 3"/50 guns.
This image was received by the Naval Photographic Center in December 1959, but was taken some years earlier.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 117KB 740 x 610 pixels

Underway off the coast of Florida, July 1959.
Photographed by Hein, from USS Saratoga (CVA-60).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 110KB 740 x 600 pixels

Photographed by Stead, while underway on 19 November 1961.
Note that the ship now has a tripod foremast, and small triple tubes for anti-submarine torpedoes amidships in place of the larger torpedo tubes originally fitted.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 120KB 740 x 605 pixels

Jacket patch of the ship's insignia, as used in about 1967.

Courtesy of Captain G.F. Swainson, USN, 1969.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 99KB 740 x 600 pixels

In addition to the images presented above, the National Archives appears to hold other views of USS Soley (DD-707). The following list features some of these images:

The images listed below are NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections.
DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions".

Reproductions of these images should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval Historical Center.


USS Soley (DD-707)

The USS Soley (DD-707), an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, was built by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company at Kearny, New Jersey. Commissioned on 7 December 1944, the Soley was commanded by Commander John S. Lewis.

In early 1945, following a shake- down cruise off Bermuda, the Soley joined the Atlantic fleet, and after serving as a training ship, she went to the West Coast, arriving there in August 1945. Soon thereafter, she joined Task Unit 96.15.1 in the Marshall Islands. The unit participated in the acceptance of the surrender of Japanese forces. In December 1945, the Soley sailed for Japan to serve with the occupation forces, remaining there until early 1946 when she was ordered back to the East Coast. On 15 April 1947, after training exercises near Cuba and a trip to Charleston, South Carolina, the Soley was placed out of commission in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.


Description

We are happy to offer a classic style 5 panel custom US Navy destroyer DD 707 USS Soley embroidered hat.

For an additional (and optional) charge of $7.00, our hats can be personalized with up to 2 lines of text of 14 characters each (including spaces), such as with a veteran’s last name and rate and rank on the first line, and years of service on the second line.

Our DD 707 USS Soley embroidered hat comes in two styles for your choosing. A traditional “high profile” flat bill snap back style (with an authentic green under visor on the bottom of the flat bill), or a modern “medium profile” curved bill velcro back “baseball cap” style. Both styles are “one size fits all”. Our hats are made of durable 100% cotton for breathability and comfort.

Given high embroidery demands on these “made to order” hats, please allow 4 weeks for shipment.

If you have any questions about our hat offerings, please contact us at 904-425-1204 or e-mail us at [email protected] , and we will be happy to speak to you!


Soley DD- 707 - History

Jan - Aug WORLD

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Soley DD 707 cruise book during this period of time. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of call: Panama Canal, San Diego, Pearl Harbor, Midway Island, Yokosuka and Sasabo Japan, Kaohsiung Formosa, Hong Kong, Kobe, Singapore, Colombo, Kenya, Durban, Cape town, Rio de Janeiro, Trinidad and Norfolk
  • Brief History of the Ship
  • Many Liberty Call Photos
  • Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Crossing the Equator Ceremony
  • Crew Roster (Name and Hometown)
  • Many crew activity photos

Over 290 pictures and the Ships story told on 76 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time of peace.


USS Soley (DD-707) - Korea

Soley steamed north to the Korean war zone and, from 22 June to 1 July, operated in the antisubmarine screen of Task Force (TF) 77, the fast carrier task force. During this period, the carriers conducted raids against the North Korean hydroelectric power stations on the Yalu River. Soley and Helena (CA-75) were detached from the task force to go to the "bomb-line" to provide shore bombardment in support of ground troops.

Soley and Helena joined Iowa (BB-61), and the trio conducted shore bombardment at Wonsan, Kojo, and Kosong through 9 July. From 21 July to 22 August, the destroyer operated with the United Nations Blockade and Escort Force (TF 95) in the Wonsan-Hung-nam area and north to Ch'aho. She bombarded railroad and highway bridges and tunnels. She took on board more than 60 prisoners and refugees from sampans in the bombardment area. During the first half of September, the destroyer operated with an antisubmarine hunter-killer group. She returned to TF 77 on 15 September (one day before Alex Soley's birthday) and operated with it until proceeding to Sasebo on 9 October.

Soley then departed the Far East on 19 October for Norfolk, but not on a direct route. She returned via Malaya, Ceylon, and Arabia proceeded through the Red Sea and the Suez Canal and made stops at ports in Italy and France, and Gibraltar and finally arrived at Norfolk on 12 December 1952. On 25 January 1953, Soley sailed for operations in the Caribbean. Upon her return to Norfolk, she commenced an overhaul and was there from 30 April to 21 August. Refresher training was held from 3 September to 2 November, followed by preparations for her second world cruise.

On 4 January 1954, Soley, Strong (DD-758), and Barton (DD-722) stood out of Norfolk en route to the west coast. They transited the Panama Canal on 9 January and anchored briefly at San Diego where Stickell (DDR-888) joined the group before continuing west. The destroyers called at Pearl Harbor and Midway before arriving at Yokosuka on 7 February. She completed a patrol off Korea, made port calls from Hong Kong to South Africa, and returned to Norfolk on 10 August 1954.


Descrição do ficheiro

This image is available from the Naval History and Heritage Command under the digital ID NH 97643.
Most of the photos found in the NHHC collection are in the public domain and may be downloaded and used without permissions or special requirements. Those which are not will be noted in the copyright section of the NHHC image description.[1]
Public domain Public domain false false

https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/ PDM Creative Commons Public Domain Mark 1.0 false false


Three Agent Orange Presumptives Added

Three conditions will be added to the list of those presumptively associated with exposure to Agent Orange. Those conditions are bladder cancer, hypothyroidism and Parkinsonism.

Vietnam War era Veterans and their survivors, who previously filed and were denied benefits for one of these three new presumptive conditions, will have their cases automatically reviewed without the need to refile a claim.

LEARN MORE

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

May 16, 2021, From John Jaskowiak, RM3 64-67

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 14, 2021

VA to readjudicate Veteran and survivor claims for possible herbicide exposure

WASHINGTON — Veterans who were previously denied service connection for an herbicide related presumptive condition due to lack of in-country Vietnam service will have their claims automatically readjudicated by VA.

The department began readjudicating claims in April for Veterans who served in the offshore waters of the Republic of Vietnam during the Vietnam War but were denied for one or more herbicide related conditions, on the basis that military service was not performed on the landmass
of the Republic of Vietnam or on its inland waterways.

“Readjudication means VA will review the evidence of record and provide replacement decisions in the cases of Veterans who were previously denied service connection benefits,” said Acting VA Under Secretary for Benefits Thomas Murphy. “We have the proper resources in place to meet the needs of our Veteran community and will ensure all eligible Veterans’ and their survivors’ claims are examined thoroughly and fairly.”

The review also applies to eligible survivors of deceased Vietnam-era Veterans and is part of the Veterans Benefits Administration’s implementation of the Nov. 5, 2020, U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California order in Nehmer vs. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, requiring VA to readjudicate previously denied claims.

VA will determine if benefits for qualifying disabilities can now be paid retroactively to the date of previously denied claims. The court’s decision requires automatic readjudication in such cases without requiring a new claim, and potentially paying benefits to the survivors or estates of deceased beneficiaries.

More information is available regarding VA disability benefits based on Agent Orange exposure.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2021 Reunion Announcement - March 9, 2021

Attention Basilone Shipmates,

We were eager to have a reunion in September however due to continued uncertainty surrounding Covid-19 the USS Basilone Association officers have decided to cancel the 2021 reunion. We know that cases of Covid-19 are down, hospitalizations are down and vaccinations are up, and by the time of the reunion most of our members should have received their vaccinations, however we are also concerned about Covid-19 variants. Also, we are concerned that there may be limitations still in place regarding the number of people allowed in restaurants and venues and there still might be closures of venues we would like to visit. It was a difficult decision to make but we believe that the health and safety of our members come first and that is why we are canceling this year’s reunion. The reunion will be rescheduled to either the week of May 10 to May 14, 2022, or May 17 to May 21, 2022, depending on the availability of hotel rooms.

Some of the comments on the 2021 Reunion Survey reflect concern about the health and safety of our members and concern that they could bring Covid-19 back to their families. Then there are other comments that believe that by September most of our members who would attend would have received vaccinations and we should be fine. As stated above the health and safety of our members comes first.

Some comments on the survey suggested we have the reunion in conjunction with the launching of the USS John Basilone, DDG-122. This would be great, but we don’t know the exact date of the launching. Tom Berry (OS3, 74-77) who works for NAVSEA has information that the Launching will be November 27, 2021. Geoff Bender’s (FTG2, 70-74) contact at NAVSEA informs him that the November 27 th date is a target date and the launching will be in the November/December time frame. (NAVSEA, stands for Naval Sea Systems Command, who oversees the construction of new ships.) We will continue to update the USS Basilone website with information about DDG-122 when it becomes available.

2021 Reunion Survey Results - Download

USS Basilone DDE/DD 824 Association Officers

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February 22, 2021, Received the below email from Jim Goodspeed

All crew members who moved from the crew barge to the Basilone during FRAM in the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard 1963-64, you were exposed to asbestos. As Damage Control Officer on the ship, I advised command against berthing crew members in berthing spaces until after all shipyard lagging work was completed.

Crew members were moved into berthing spaces before completion of lagging for the convenience of the Government. If you were moved aboard during this period, YOU WERE EXPOSED TO ASBESTOS.

You need to document your exposure and use this evidence to support any current or future VA claims for respiratory issues.

YOU MAY CITE THIS EMAIL TO SUPPORT YOUR CLAIM.

James Goodspeed LT USN DCA, FRAM 1963-64

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

January 19, 2021, From: Frank Stepka, SN 70-73

On Jan. 1, 2020, the Blue Water Navy (BWN) Vietnam Veterans Act went into law, supporting Veterans who may be eligible for benefits based on presumption of herbicide exposure. One year later, VA reflects on its progress.

Granting benefits

As of Nov. 30, 2020, VA has processed 39,061 of 75,205 claims received. Of those, 27,366 were granted – awarding more than $724 million in retroactive benefits. The most common granted claims included medical conditions diabetes, malignant growth of the lung, coronary bypass surgery, malignant growths of genitourinary system and coronary artery disease.
In addition, the law provides benefits for children born with certain health conditions whose parent was a Veteran with verified herbicide exposure while serving in Thailand.

Eligibility

The law affects Veterans who served on vessels operating not more than 12 nautical miles seaward from the demarcation line of the waters of Vietnam and Cambodia, as defined in Public Law 116-23 . Veterans, their dependents, and survivors who meet this criteria can apply for these approved benefits.

Veterans – and survivors of deceased Veterans – who served in or near the Korean Demilitarized Zone from Sept. 1, 1967, to Aug. 31, 1971, can apply for benefits.

Increasing accessibility

To help implement the law, VA collaborated with the National Archives and Records Administration to digitize all Navy and Coast Guard deck logs for ships with known Vietnam service. Digitization of the Navy deck logs was completed in December 2019 Coast Guard deck logs were completed in September 2020. As part of the agreement, VA provided digital images of the deck logs to NARA to make them digitally available in the National Archives Catalog. Veterans may contact [email protected] if the deck log they are seeking is not available in the National Archives Catalog.

Learn more about Agent Orange exposure and VA disability compensation or call 800-827-1000 for more information.

The USS Basilone Association welcomes all crew members, their family and friends to the official site of the USS Basilone DDE 824, DD 824. The Basilone is a post WWII Gearing Class Destroyer that in its lifetime was home to all the men that served on her.

This site was created to bring all of Basilone’s former crew together where old friendships could be rekindled. The Association has been running Reunions since 1994 and the creation of this site was a natural continuance to bringing Basilone’s crew together and a way to remember crew members that are no longer with us. During the gallant life of the Basilone she had many miles and the tales are still being told all over the US.

The Photo Center is the place you can rest assured will put a smile on your face. Hard to believe we actually looked like that. We have vintage and photos from past reunions. If you have photos you want to add to the Photo Center, contact the webmaster to add your photos to the Photo Center.

The Ship’s History section tells not only the complete history of the USS Basilone but also about John Basilone the Marine Medal of Honor recipient the USS Basilone is named after. And as Basilone sailed the world’s oceans they were not always a safe place to be. In the Basilone Tragedies section of Ship’s History we talk about the events that occurred on the Basilone and remember the men who lost their lives.

In Memoriam is the page we list all the Basilone Crew that are no longer with us.


Pioneer RT-707

december 1977

c. 1982

Later version of the Pioneer RT-701.

Unlike its original, the RT-707 isn't rare, at all.
Pioneer sold thousands and thousands and thousands of them worldwide : when the reel-to-reel market was beginning to stop its continuous rise, a small-sized recorder was a better option than a full-tilt RT-2044 or Sony TC-880-2.

Size-wise the RT-707 was far more successful at being a small reel-to-reel than ELCASETs were at trying to bridge gaps.

The RT-707 is an RT-701 with auto-reverse and with independent L/R record switches - therefore with a repeat switch next to the pitch control know, with a direction switch next to the pause button and two play head azimuth adjustments on the head block.

However famed, the RT-707 started as a fairly simple recorder with a minimum of features, packed in a very attractive design - the RT-701. That is probably the reason why Pioneer remained fairly discrete about it in Japan : if pretty as can be, the RT-707 nevertheless is a basic entry-level tape recorder.
It is sales manager throughout the world which, after discovering the RT-701, probably asked for something more meaty - enter the RT-707 and, later, this time quite above the entry-level of the 701/707, the much bigger and most magnificent RT-909.

Both models remained available much later outside Japan, being advertsied as exciting products as late as 1981 in the USA or Germany when they were relegated to the back pages of the catalogs since 1979 .
I can see the RT-707 still advertised (back-pages only) until december 1981 in Japan.

The big Pioneer bible published by Stereo Sound in early 1978 has very little space devoted to the RT-707 : not a diagram, not an exploded view of the drive nor a sample of the design iterations.

It seems a very small batch of black RT-707 was made sometime during the long (export) production run but I have yet to find a catalog image of it.

The design slant of the 701 / 707 was carried on by Akai with the even prettier GX-77, also a besteller. The latter, however, came when open-reel recorders really were out of the picture and was built according to that.
The RT-707 still was clearly on the 1970s side of things : solid .


Product & Technology Milestones

SMC-70 Sony's first 8-bit personal computer, featuring the independently developed Sony BASIC computing language and incorporating a 3.5 floppy drive among other features. Its external numeric keypad and highly compact design were also considered highly attractive features.

SMC-70

SMC-777 Complete with keyboard, this personal computer was designed for the novice user. Eight software programs (running on Sony BASIC) were included as part of the package.

SMC-777

HB-55 This model led to the popularization of MSX standard personal computers. The HB-53 was priced around 50,000 yen and was nicknamed the "HIT BIT."

CDX-5 Car CD player with a compact body designed to resist vibration and heat, and equipped with a one-action automatic loading system that automatically pulls in CDs for ease of operation.

CDX-J10 CD auto-changer that allows users to enjoy playing only their favorite discs and songs by simply inserting a compact "CD magazine" that can hold 10 CDs into the main unit. The main unit is installed in the trunk and operated from inside the car with a remote control.

CDX-J10

NWS-830 The UNIX-based "NEWS" workstation for developers. A 16.67-MHz MC68020 served as the CPU, and this model featured an internal 3.5-inch floppy drive. This workstation was equivalent in size to a personal computer.

NWS-830

PJ-100 This extremely portable Japanese language word processor with external printer featured a 2-inch data disk drive. This product was called the "PRODUCE 100."

PJ-100

CDX-A30RF CD auto-changer that converts CD audio signals into FM signals and sends the signals to car audio systems with FM radios to enjoy music. This system was very popular at the time, allowing people to listen to CDs even in car audio systems that only had radios.

CDX-A30RF

PTC-500 First of the "Palm Top" range of compact computers enabling handwritten input. This model incorporated personal information management software.

PTC-500

DD-1 First model "Data Discman" electronic book player.

DTX-10 In-vehicle DAT player with CD changer control function and built-in FM/AM tuner. It uses a non-tracking system that provides excellent vibration resistance.

DTX-10

MDX-U1 The world's first car mini-disc player capable of MD shuffle play, repeat play, and intro scan, which allows users to listen to the first 10 seconds of a song in order.

MDX-U1

NVX-F10 A car navigation system with a 4-inch color LCD monitor. High operability is achieved with the included wireless joystick remote control and the Mach Scroll function that allows scrolling the map at high speed.

NVX-F10

PLM-50 The &lsquoGlasstron&rsquo personal LCD monitor was a head-mounted system that enabled individuals to enjoy realistic video equivalent to that of a 52-inch screen.

PLM-50

PCV-90 This product marked the advent of VAIO and was placed on the US market one year prior to being placed on the Japanese. It ran on Windows 95 with a Pentium 200-MHz processor. The dedicated "VAIO Space" on-screen graphic user interface came preinstalled.

PCV-90

PCG-707 The VAIO notebook was introduced in Japan in July 1997 (one year after the US). From the very outset, the docking station was part of the VAIO notebook package. This model offered superior expandability in a slim body.

PCG-707

PCV-T700MR This first VAIO desktop model featured Video CD production software and MPEG-based TV signal recording while also sporting a CD-R drive.

PCV-T700MR

PCG-505 First-generation VAIO Notebook 505 featured a surprisingly slim magnesium body. Sales of sub-notebook PCs skyrocketed following the introduction of this model which was lauded for successfully for opening up new horizons for the sub-notebook market.

PCG-505

PCG-C1 Equipped with a CCD camera, this VAIO C1 mini-notebook took the world by storm. The first-generation model featured an MMX Pentium 233-MHz processor and a 3.2-GB hard drive.

PCG-C1

PEG-S500C

PCV-MX1V7 First-generation VAIO MX series model with integrated stereo. Featuring a dedicated amplifier and speakers, this model offered superior sound quality not normally found in personal computers. The MD slot and decorative liquid crystal on the front were attention-grabbing features.

PCV-MX1V7

PCV-LX80/BPK The liquid-crystal tablet featured a double hinge, enabling the screen to be tilted up to approximately 65 degrees. This device featured a palm rest/keyboard cover in addition to many other innovative features.

PCV-LX80/BPK

PCG-QR1/BP The translucent black body was enclosed in an aluminum-tone casing. With the attached aluminum handle, this VAIO was as convenient to carry as a briefcase.

PCG-QR1/BP

PEG-NR70V Entertainment version of the CLIE, incorporating a 100,000-pixel digital CMOS camera within its main, foldable body. It featured a F2.8, f=35mm approx. (35mm conversion) lens, and a shooting range of 30cm to infinity. The 300 degree rotating camera enabled the user to easily take shots of themselves, while the 3.8-inch 320 x 480 dot high-resolution liquid crystal screen displayed high quality still and video images.

PEG-NR70V

MEX-1HD Car audio system with a built-in 10GB hard disk drive that can store over 2000 songs. Sound sources can be recorded from CDs to the hard disk drive at up to 8x speed in ATRAC3 format.

MEX-1HD

PCG-U1 This was the world's smallest and lightest* PC running Microsoft Windows XP. The computer's unique design enabled comfortable operation even while holding with both hands.
(*As of April 1, 2002)

PCG-U1

PEG-NZ90 High-end model, featuring a 2,000,000-pixel CCD camera and FeliCa (contactless IC card) reader.

PEG-NZ90

PEG-UX50 This model incorporated a wide screen, color liquid crystal display within a compact frame roughly the same size as a business-card holder. It could easily be connected to a network using its wireless LAN and Bluetooth (R) functions. (Also featured a 310,000-pixel approx. CMOS camera capable of 300 degree rotation.)

PEG-UX50

PCG-Z1/P VAIO Notebook Z, utilizing Intel Centrino mobile technology (designed specifically for mobility), featured a highly-advanced 14.1-inch SXGA+ LCD display (1,400x1,050). It also offered an extended battery life of approximately seven hours during standard use.

PCG-Z1/P

PCG-X505 "VAIO 505 Extreme," was the ultimate mobile notebook. Thanks to high-density IC packaging technology and new exterior materials, this notebook achieved both a lightweight structure and a slim profile, with the front edge of the body measuring only 9.7mm.

PCG-X505

PEG-VZ90 Featuring an organic EL display, this model was capable of delivering high quality video and still images.

PEG-VZ90

NV-XYZ77 "XYZ Series" AV navigation system with integrated hard disk drive, which uses a 6.5-inch WVGA monitor and can guide you through major intersections with 3D video as if it were a real picture.

NV-XYZ77

VGC-LA70B VGC-LB50B Type L moves beyond conventional notions of "notebook" and "desktop" design to offer customers the "all-in-one" Type L. Type L is an invitation to a new lifestyle and designed to blend in perfectly wherever it goes.

VGC-LA70B VGC-LB50B

VGN-AR70B Vaio Type A, the world's first Blu-ray disc notebook.*
View and edit HD video in all its full-resolution glory, and then save it to BD.
(*As of May 16, 2006)

VGN-AR70B

VGN-UX90PS VGN-UX0S Introducing Vaio Type U, a palm-size PC that uses flash memory instead of a conventional hard disk drive. At only 492 grams, this model delivers fast memory access, longer operation, and better shock resistance.

VGN-UX90PS VGN-UX0S

NV-U1 A portable navigation system termed "nav-u" with a suction cup on its base for easy attachment to car dashboards.

VGN-P70H This model is small enough to slip into a jacket pocket or handbag while still offering full-PC features.

VGN-P70H

VAIO "W Series" VAIO W, a new line of the VAIO brand offieing low-priced subnotebook models designed mainly for Web browsing and e-mailing.

VAIO "W Series"

PRS-350 PRS-650 Sony Reader, with its slim, lightweight body made it easy and fun to read e-books.
“Reader Pocket Edition” “Reader Touch Edition”

PRS-350 PRS-650

VAIO "W Series" Eco-edition VAIO W series---Part of the chassis featured 80% (Approx.) recycled material.

VAIO "W Series"

HMZ-T1 World's first* 3D-compatible head mounted display equipped with an HD organic EL panel.
* As a consumer-use 3D-compatible head mounted display (at the time of release on August 31, 2011)

HMZ-T1

VAIO "Z Series" A mobile PC incorporating advanced performance such as accelerated startup and image processing, coupled with superior &lsquomobility.&rsquo

VAIO "Z Series"

VAIO® Duo 11 The VAIO Duo 11 is a tablet/PC hybrid with an appealing slider design. Companion digitizer stylus makes this the perfect device for creating intricate handwritten notes and detailed drawings.

VAIO® Duo 11

VAIO® Tap 20 The VAIO Tap 20 is a battery-powered tabletop PC with a large, 20-inch LCD screen and a freestyle stand that can be set to virtually any angle to accommodate a variety of viewing styles.

VAIO® Tap 20

VAIO® Fit 15 Equipped with an extremely bright LCD display compatible with Full HD quality visuals, enabling users to enjoy photos and video in vivid detail. Boasts a thin build of 22.5 mm* and touch functionality.
* Excludes protruding parts.

VAIO® Fit 15

VAIO® Pro 13 Achieved the world's lightest build* with ultra-light, durable carbon fiber while boasting enhanced toughness through the adoption of a "Hexa-shell" body design.
* Among 13 inch Ultrabooks, etc. with touch functionality (as of June 10, 2013 according to Sony research)

VAIO® Pro 13

RSX-GS9 High-resolution media receiver with native DSD playback, USB DAC function, and high quality music playback.


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